The New American Painting: As Shown in Eight European Countries, 1958-1959

By Museum of Modern Art | Go to book overview

CATALOGUE
The data contained in the biographical notes for each artist have been compiled from the most reliable sources available and wherever possible have been checked with the artist himself. All one-man shows for each artist have been listed. The section Included in: lists major group exhibitions in the United States in which the artist was represented by two or more works. Group exhibitions outside the United States: lists all such exhibitions in which the artist was represented, even by a single work.Many of the biographies refer to the 'WPA Federal Art Project'. This was part of the Works Progress Administration, a nation-wide programme established by the United States Government in 1935 to combat unemployment resulting from the Great Depression.Unframed dimensions given; height precedes width. The arrangement of the items is chronological. Parentheses indicate that dates are not shown on the work itself. ★Works marked with a star are illustrated.
WILLIAM BAZIOTES
Biography: Born 1912, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; grew up in Reading, Pennsylvania. To New York, 1933; studied at National Academy of Design, 1933-6. Worked on WPA Federal Art Project, New York, as teacher 1936-8, on easel painting project 1938-41. In 1948, founder with Motherwell, Newman, and Rothko, of school on East 8th Street, New York, 'Subjects of the Artist', out of which grew 'The Club' with weekly meetings of avant-garde artists. Taught at Brooklyn Museum Art School, New York, 1949-52; New York University, 1949-52; People's Art Center of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1950-2; Hunter College, New York, 1952 to present. Lives in New York.One-man shows: Art of This Century ( Peggy Guggenheim), New York, 1944; Galerie Maeght, Paris, 1947; Kootz Gallery, New York, yearly 1946-8, 1950-4, 1956, 1958.Included in:15 Americans, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1952; The New Decade, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, shown thereafter in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Colorado Springs and St Louis, 1955-6.Group Exhibitions outside the United States of America: Kootz Gallery Group, Galerie Maeght, Paris, 1947; American Vanguard Art for Paris, Galerie de France, Paris, 1952 (shown at Sidney Janis Gallery, New York, 1951-2); U.S. Representation, II Bienal, São Paulo, 1953; U.S. Representation, Tenth Inter-American Conference, Caracas, 1954; Modern Art in the United States: Selections from the Collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, Paris, Zurich, Barcelona, Frankfurt, London, The Hague, Vienna, and Belgrade, 1955-6.
★1 Dwarf 1947 Oil on canvas 42 × 361/8 in. Lent by The Museum of Modern Art, New York ( A. Conger Goodyear Fund)
★2 Primeval Landscape 1953 Oil on canvas 60 × 72 in. Lent by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia ( Samuel S. Fleisher Art Memorial)
★3 Pompeii 1956 Oil on canvas 60 × 48 in. Lent by The Museum of Modern Art, New York ( Mrs Louise Smith Fund)
4 Red Landscape 1957 Oil on canvas 72¼ × 60¼ in. Lent by The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis ( Bigelow Fund)

JAMES BROOKS

Biography: Born 1906, St Louis, Missouri; grew up in various parts of the West. In Dallas, Texas, 1916-26; attended Southern Methodist University, Dallas, 1923-5. To New York, 1926; studied at Art Students' League with Kimon Nicolaides and Boardman Robinson, 1927-30. Worked on WPA Federal Art Project, New York, 1938-42, painting murals at Queensborough Public Library, Woodside Branch, 1938, and International Overseas Air Terminal, La Guardia Airport, 1942. Served in U.S.Army, 1942-5, in Egypt and Middle East. Fifth prize, 1952 Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Painting, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Taught at Columbia University, New York, 1946-8; visiting critic of painting, Yale University, 1955-6. Teacher, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, 1948 to present. Lives in New York and Springs, Long Island, New York. One-man shows: Peridot Gallery, New York, yearly 1950-3; Miller-Pollard Gallery, Seattle, 1952; Area Arts, San

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