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Self-Help and Popular Religion in Early American Culture: An Interpretive Guide

By Roy M. Anker | Go to book overview

Bibliography

"Accord Reached on Christian Science Book". Christian Century 110 ( 1993): 1233.

Adams James Truslow. The Founding of New England. Boston: Atlantic, 1921.

Ahlstrom Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1972.

Albanese Catherine L. America, Religions and Religion. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 1981.

------. Corresponding Motion: Transcendental Religion and the New America. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1977.

------. Nature Religion in America: From the Algonkian Indians to the New Age. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990.

------. "Transcendentalism". In Lippy and Williams, 1117-28.

Aldridge A. Owen. "The Alleged Puritanism of Benjamin Franklin". In Lemay, Reappraising Benjamin Franklin, 362-71.

------. Benjamin Franklin and Nature's God. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1967.

------. "Enlightenment and Awakening in Edwards and Franklin". In Oberg and Stout, 27-41.

Allen David Grayson. "'Both Englands.'". In Hall and Allen, 55-82.

------. In English Ways: The Movement of Societies and the Transferal of English Local Law and Custom to Massachusetts Bay in the Seventeenth Century. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1981.

Anderson Virginia DeJohn. "Migrants and Motives: Religion and the Settlement of New England, 1630-1640". New England Quarterly 58 ( 1985): 339-83.

------. New England's Generation: The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991.

-227-

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