The Germanic Mosaic: Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Society

By Carol Aisha Blackshire-Belay | Go to book overview

APPENDIX
Census Data (1980) on Home Language in the RSA (Excluding "Independent" Homelands)
LANGUAGE WHITES COLOUREDS ASIANS BLACKS TOTAL
Official languages
Afrikanns 2 581 080 2 251 860 15 500 77 320 4 925 760
English 1 763 220 324 360 698 940 29 120 2 815 640
__________
Subtotal 7 741 400
Other European languages
Dutch 11 740 11 740
German 40 240 40 240
Greek 16 780 16 780
Italian 16 600 16 600
Portuguese 57 080 57 080
French 6 340 6 340
__________
Subtotal 148 780
Oriental languages
Tamil 24 720 24 720
Hindi 25 900 25 900
Telegu 4 000 4 000
Gudjarati 25 120 25 120
Urdu 13 280 13 280
Chinese 2 700 2 700
__________
Subtotal 95 720
African languages (total 16 777 322)
Nguni languages
Xhosa 8 440 2 870 920 2 879 360
Zulu 5 580 6 058 900 6 064 480
Swazi 1 060 649 540 650 600
South-Ndebele 440 289 220 289 660
North-Ndebele 100 170 120 170 220
__________
Subtotal 10 054 322
Sotho/Tswana
North Ssotho 2 440 2 429 180 2 431 620
South Sotho 5 320 1 872 520 1 877 840
Tswana 9 300 1 346 360 1 355 660
__________
Subtotal 5 665 120
Tsonga 1 180 986 960 888 140
Venda 40 169 700 169 700
Other 35 020 2 660 11 160 73 900 122 740
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
TOTALS 4 528 100 2 612 780 821 320 16 923 760 24 886 020
Source: Republic of S.A. Population Census 1980. Home Language by Statistical Region and District Report No. 02-80-10.
Government Printer. Pretoria.

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