The Germanic Mosaic: Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Society

By Carol Aisha Blackshire-Belay | Go to book overview

he did not want to become a Christian and that he would pray night and day to God to forgive him the lie into which he had been forced by desperation. He wanted to live and die as a Jew, because the God of our Fathers had obviously helped him and stood by him. ( Dühnen- und Berggeschichten II: 74) [ Dune and Mountain Stories]

" Sarah" thus becomes Lewald's standard tale of upward mobility -- her major theme-from working class to middle class to aristocracy-with the added fillip of a woman being able to run a business as well as or better than a man.

Lewald considered all organized religions, and especially the patriarchal basis of Judeo-Christianity, a propogation of the concept of the autocratic tyranny of arbitrary monarchs, ruling by "divine right." And she had learned that Judaism was especially male-dominated early in her life, when her father gave her the example of the old Hebrew morning prayer, in which the man thanks God, because he was not made a woman, while the woman has to give thanks for being created according to His will. Yet in many ways, although she found Judaism archaic and inconvenient, she remained essentially Jewish although nominally Christian, because her critics saw her as such and she had so many close relationships with Jewish intellectual and political figures. Especially in the reviews of Prinz Louis Ferdinand did these opinions surface, as for example, when Sternberg, the book reviewer for the Preußische Zeitung, stated that Lewald was "a Jewess and all her earlier novels were written to glorify Judaism" and that she apparently was the only one who seemed to present the prince as a secret propagandist for the. Jews. He also accused her of being democratic and a friend of such known Jewish liberals as Simon and Jacoby-a far more justifiable statement. In a basically laudatory and lengthy 1874 article about Lewald by Julian Schmidt in the Deutsche Illustrierte Monatshefte, which had first published many of her emancipatory essays, he states that German liberalism and the emancipation of the German Jews were so bound up with one another that Lewald's generally pro-Jewish position was predetermined (98). As woman and as Jew, as Prussian patriot and liberal democrat (who realized democracy and liberalism had no future in the Germany of her time), and as author and journalist, Fanny Lewald is an interesting and underestimated figure in German culture.


NOTES
1
All translations are by the author.
2
The equivalent situation in Jenny and family letters seem to indicate that the young man's family, particularly his mother, might have had strong objections to the marriage.

-272-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Germanic Mosaic: Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 318

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.