The Germanic Mosaic: Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Society

By Carol Aisha Blackshire-Belay | Go to book overview

About the Editor and Contributors

CAROL AISHA BLACKSHIRE-BELAY is Director of the International Afro-German Network and teaches Germanic Linguistics and Cultural Studies at The Ohio State University. Widely recognized as one of the leading experts on minorities in contemporary German society, her publications have appeared in the Journal of Black Studies, University of Pennsylvania Review of Linguistics, OSU Foreign Language Publications, and ERIC Resources in Education. Included among her books are The Image of Africa in German Society, Language Contact. Verb Morphology in German of Foreign Workers, and Foreign Workers' German: A Concise Glossary of Verbal Phrases. Her current research deals with multiculturalism in German-speaking societies, and the impact of German colonialism on non-European societies.

IRMGARD ACKERMANN is one of the leading scholars on the writings of contemporary foreign women's literature in Germany. Dr. Ackermann has authored a series of books, articles, and monographs on the works and contributions of this population group. She has presented numerous papers on the subject of foreign women writers in Germany.

CHRISTOPHER R. CLASON is Assistant Professor German at Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan. He attended UCLA, UC Santa Barbara, and UC Davis. He was a Germanistic Society of America Fellow at Georg August Universität Göttingen from 1984 to 1985. Dr. Clason is currently revising his dissertation, which bears the title E. T. A. Hoffman's Kater Murr. Feline Characteristics and Their Literary Expression. His research interests include German poetry, German Romanticism, and German Poetic Realism.

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