The Home-Front War: World War II and American Society

By Kenneth Paul O'Brien; Lynn Hudson Parsons | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Studs Terkel, "The Good War": An Oral History of World War II. ( New York: Pantheon, 1984), 282.
2.
George H. Roeder Jr., The Censored War: American Visual Experience during World War Two. ( New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1993), 82-83.
3.
Mark Harris, Franklin Mitchell, and Steven Schechter, The Homefront: America during World War II. ( New York: G. P. Putnam, 1984), 239-40.
4.
William O'Neill, A Democracy at War: America's Fight at Home and Abroad in World War II. ( New York: Free Press, 1993), 434. See also Allan Winkler, The Politics of Propaganda: The Office of War Information, 1942-1945 ( New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1978), 38-72.
5.
See O'Neill A Democracy at War, but the book that explores this aspect of the war years most fully is Paul Fussell Wartime: Understanding and Behavior in the Second World War ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1989).
6.
See "Monroe County Remembers the War," Monroe County Historian's Office, SUNY College at Brockport, Brockport, NY. The interviews with 83 county residents were conducted by a group of graduate students in the summer of 1992 as part of an oral history seminar. The funding for transcription of the tapes was provided by grants from the New York Council for the Humanities and the Daisy Marquis Jones Foundation.
7.
Michael C. C. Adams, The Best War Ever: America and World War II ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994), xiii-xiv.
8.
That World War II sparked an outpouring of Hollywood films is beyond doubt, and this story has been told most carefully in Clayton Koppes and Gregory Black Hollywood Goes to War: How Politics, Profits, and Propaganda Shaped World War II Movies. ( New York: Free Press, 1987). But this is a story of many facets, one of the most provocative of which appears in George Roeder The Censored War. Roeder opens his second chapter, "A Cast of Millions," with the claim that "World War II was the first movie every American could be in." (p. 43).
9.
For the transcriptions of those extraordinary presentations, see "A Round Table: The Living and Reliving of World War II, " Journal of American History 77 ( 1990):553- 93. Richard Wightman Fox's thoughtful commentary introduces the six recollections.
10.
Patrick C. O'Brien is the father of Kenneth P. O'Brien. The son was told a tale, perhaps apocryphal, that his name, his initials really, were an indication of his father's work on the evening of his birth in October 1943. This is just one very small measure of the many ways that the war entered American lives.

-10-

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