The Home-Front War: World War II and American Society

By Kenneth Paul O'Brien; Lynn Hudson Parsons | Go to book overview

NOTES

The author wishes to express his gratitude for assistance received in support of this research from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Philosophical Society, and the Division of Sponsored Research at the University of Florida.

1.
Anthony D. Smith, "War and Ethnicity: The Role of Warfare in the Formation, Self-Images and Cohesion of Ethnic Communities," Ethnic and Racial Studies 4 ( October 1981): 375. Smith's work was concerned with structuring a general theory to account for these two factors in conflicts stretching from the time of the Egyptian kingdoms to the present.
2.
Studies that do deal with ethnic groups have tended to explore dramatic events such as the Japanese relocation and/or the aforementioned political and foreign policy implications of ethnic attachments. See, for example, Roger Daniels, Concentration Camps U.S.A. ( New York, 1971); James Miller, The United States and Italy, 1940-1950: The Politics and Diplomacy of Stabilization ( Chapel Hill, NC, 1986); Maddalena Tirabassi , "La Mazzini Society (1940-1946): un associazione degli antifascisti italiani negli Stati Uniti," in Giorgio Spini, et al., eds., Italia e America dalla grande guerra a oggi ( Venezia, 1976); Louis Gerson, The Hyphenate in Recent American Politics and Diplomacy ( Lawrence, KS, 1964); John Jeffries, Forging the Roosevelt Coalition ( Chapel Hill, NC, 1976); Winston Van Horne, ed., Ethnicity and War ( Milwaukee, WI, 1984); and Antonio Varsori, Gli alleati e l'emigrazione democratica antifascista, 1940-1943 (Firenze, 1982); Leo V. Kanawada, Franklin Roosevelt's Diplomacy and American Catholics, Italians and Jews ( Ann Arbor, MI, 1982); Lorraine Lees, "National Security and Ethnicity: Contrasting Views During World War II," Diplomatic History, 11 (Winter 1987): 114-125. The literature on Canada during World War II has been more attentive to the impact of war on European ethnic groups. See Norman Hillmer et al., eds., On Guard for Thee: War, Ethnicity, and the Canadian State, 1939-1945 ( Ottawa, 1988); Luigi Bruti-Liberati, Il Canada, l'Italia e il fascismo, 1919-1945 ( Rome, 1984).
3.
John Diggins excellent book, Mussolini and Fascism: The View from America ( Princeton, 1972) is something of an exception, but, as he himself indicated, it rather narrowly concentrates on the nature of American public opinion toward fascism. See also Richard Polenberg, One Nation Divisible: Class, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States Since 1938 ( New York, 1980); LaVern J. Rippley, The German Americans ( New York, 1984); Mike Davis, Prisoners of the American Dream: Politics and Economy in the History of the U.S. Working Class ( London, 1986); John Blum, V Was for Victory: Politics and American Culture ( New York, 1976); Howard F. Stein and Robert F. Hill, The Ethnic Imperative ( University Park, PA, 1977), which sees the war as the "great crucible of amalgamation"; Allan M. Winker, Homefront U.S.A.: America during World War II ( Arlington Heights, IL, 1986); especially, Andrew Hacker, The End of the American Era ( New York, 1970), which claims that "the war implanted in second and third generation immigrants an impatience to accelerate their assimilation into the mainstream of American life."
4.
See, in particular, Richard D. Alba, Italian Americans: Into the Twilight of Ethnicity ( Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1985). Steven Fox entertaining The Unknown Internment: An Oral History of the Relocation of Italian Americans during World War II ( Boston, 1990) is largely silent on larger interpretations. For more general treatments:

-76-

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