The Home-Front War: World War II and American Society

By Kenneth Paul O'Brien; Lynn Hudson Parsons | Go to book overview

bourgeois family with its bipolar model of gendered capabilities has been a prominent feature of American life since at least the nineteenth century, and I think it is important to recognize the deep cultural assumptions upon which it rests. World War II provides us with an example of the connection between essentialist notions of women as selfless nurturers and a kind of chauvinist patriotism that conceives of America as the vanguard of civilization and evolutionary progress. Both ideas have been seriously challenged in the last 20 years, but we need to examine the full legacy of World War II, its aftermath as well as its striking innovations, lest we forget the power of these images to destroy the potential for egalitarian work roles in American life.


NOTES
1.
Maureen Honey, Creating Rosie the Riveter: Class, Gender, and Propaganda during World War II (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1984). Other analyses of women's role in the war include Karen Anderson, Wartime Women: Sex Roles, Family Relations and the Status of Women during World War II (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1981); William Chafe, The American Woman: Her Changing Social, Economic and Political Roles 1920-1970 ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1972); Sherna Gluck, Rosie the Riveter Revisited: Women, the War, and Social Change ( Boston: Twayne, 1987); Susan Hartmann, The Home Front and Beyond: American Women in the 1940s ( Boston: Twayne, 1982); Leila Rupp, Mobilizing Women for War: German and American Propaganda 1939-1945 ( Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1978).
2.
Critiques of the bias in contemporary popular culture include Todd Gittin, Inside Prime Time ( New York: Pantheon Books, 1983); Chandra Mukerji and Michael Schudson , eds., Rethinking Popular Culture: Contemporary Perspectives in Cultural Studies ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991).
3.
By the 1940s, the feminist movement had fizzled as an effective political force and would not be revived until the 1960s. For a discussion of how it lapsed, see William O'Neill , Everyone Was Brave: A History of Feminism in America ( New York: Quadrangle Books, 1968).
4.
Studies that stress the importance of American production capacity in winning the war are Industrial Mobilization for War: History of the War Production Board and Predecessor Agencies 1940-1945, vol. 1 ( Washington, DC: Government Printing Office 1947); Eliot Janeway, The Struggle for Survival: A Chronicle of Economic Mobilization in World War II ( New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1951); Sumner Slichter, Economic Factors Affecting Industrial Relations Policy in National Defense, Industrial Relations Monography, no. 6 ( New York: Industrial Relations, 1941).
5.
There is evidence of this concern in government documents from the period directed at magazine editors. See "War Production Drive," "Toughening Up for War," Magazine War Guide ( December/January 1943) entry 345, box 1700; "Discomfort," Magazine War Guide ( March/April 1943), entry 345, box 1700. All government documents cited in this chapter are from Records of the Office of War Information Record Group 208, National Records Center, Suitland, MD.

-102-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Home-Front War: World War II and American Society
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.