Abraham Lincoln and Men of War-Times: Some Personal Recollections of War and Politics during the Lincoln Administration

By A. K. McClure; James A. Rawley | Go to book overview

CONTENTS.
PAGE
LINCOLN IN 1860 --His First Nomination for President at Chicago -- How Seward was Overthrown-Curtin and Lane Defeated him and Nominated Lincoln--The October States decided it --Seward's Nomination would have Defeated Curtin in Pennsylvania and Lane in Indiana at the October Elections--The School Question made Seward Unavailable--The Bitterness of Seward's Friends after his Defeat27
A VISIT TO LINCOLN --First Impressions of the New President -- Ungraceful in Dress and Manner --His Homely Ways soon Forgotten in Conversation--Lincoln's Midnight Journey --The Harrisburg Dinner to Lincoln by Governor Curtin--Discussion of a Change of Route -- Decided against Lincoln's Protest --Colonel Scott's Direction of Lincoln's Departure--A Night of Painful Anxiety --The Cheering Message of Lincoln's Arrival in Washington received44
LINCOLN'S SORE TRIALS --Without Hearty Support from any Party --Confused Republican Councils --A Discordant Cabinet from the Start --How Union Generals Failed --A Memorable Conference with General Scott in the White House--His Ideas of Protecting the Capital --The People Unprepared for War and Unprepared for its Sacrifices59
LINCOLN'S CHARACTERISTICS --The most Difficult of Characters to Analyze--None but Himself his Parallel --He Confided in None without Reservation--How Davis, Swett, Lamon, and Herndon Estimated him--The Most Reticent and Secretive of Men --He Heard all and Decided for Himself--Among the Greatest in Statesmanship and the Master Politician of his Day--How his Sagacity Settled the Mollie Maguire Rebellion in Pennsylvania72
LINCOLN IN POLITICS --His Masterly Knowledge of Political Strategy--The Supreme Leader of his Party --How fie held Warring Factions to his Support--His First Blundering Venture in his Presidential Contest--He was Master of Leaders, and not of Details --His Intervention in the Curtin Contest of 1863--How be made James Gordon Bennett his Friend when the Political Horizon was Dark--His Strategy in making a Faithless Officer perform his Duty without Provoking Political Complications85
LINCOLN AND EMANCIPATION --Willing to Save or Destroy Slavery to Save the Union--Not a Sentimental Abolitionist --His Earnest Efforts for Compensated Emancipation--Slavery could have been Saved --The Suicidal Action of the Border States --The Preliminary Proclamation offered Perpetuity to Slavery if the Rebellion ended January 1, 1863--How the Republic gradually Gravitated to Emancipation --Lincoln eloquently Appeals to the Border-State Representatives--The Violent Destruction of Slavery the most Colossal Suicide of History--Appeals to Lincoln to avoid Political Disasters by Rejecting Emancipation --He Builded Better than he Knew98
LINCOLN AND HAMLIN --Why Lincoln Nominated Johnson in 1864 --A Southern War Democrat Needed --The Gloomy Outlook of the Political Battle--Lincoln would have been Defeated at any Time in 1864 before the Victories of Sherman at Atlanta and Sheridan in the Valley --The Two Campaign Speeches which Decided the Contest made by Sherman and Sheridan--The Republican Leaders not in Sympathy with LincolnLincoln

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Abraham Lincoln and Men of War-Times: Some Personal Recollections of War and Politics during the Lincoln Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Introduction 7
  • Preface 17
  • Contents 21
  • List of Illustrations 25
  • Lincoln in 1860. 27
  • A Visit to Lincoln. 44
  • Lincoln's Characteristics. 72
  • Lincoln in Politics. 85
  • Lincoln and Emancipation. 98
  • Lincoln and Hamlin. 115
  • Lincoln and Chase. 132
  • Lincoln and Cameron. 147
  • Lincoln and Stanton. 170
  • Lincoln and Grant. 189
  • Lincoln and Mcclellan. 208
  • Lincoln and Sherman. 226
  • Lincoln and Curtin. 248
  • Lincoln and Stevens. 277
  • Lincoln and Greeley. 312
  • Our Unrewarded Heroes. 355
  • The Pennsylvania Reserve Corps. 423
  • Appendix. 457
  • Index. 483
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