Abraham Lincoln and Men of War-Times: Some Personal Recollections of War and Politics during the Lincoln Administration

By A. K. McClure; James A. Rawley | Go to book overview

LINCOLN IN POLITICS.

IF Abraham Lincoln was not a master politician, I am entirely ignorant of the qualities which make up such a character. In a somewhat intimate acquaintance with the public men of the country for a period of more than a generation, I have never met one who made so few mistakes in politics as Lincoln. The man who could call Seward as Premier of his administration, with Weed the power behind the Premier, often stronger than the Premier himself, and yet hold Horace Greeley even within the ragged edges of the party lines, and the man who could call Simon Cameron to his Cabinet in Pennsylvania without alienating Governor Curtin, and who could remove Cameron from his Cabinet without alienating Cameron, would naturally be accepted as a man of much more than ordinary political sagacity. Indeed, I have never known one who approached Lincoln in the peculiar faculty of holding antagonistic elements to his own support, and maintaining close and often apparently confidential relations with each without offense to the other. This is the more remarkable from the fact that Lincoln was entirely without training in political management. I remember on one occasion, when there was much concern felt about a political contest in Pennsylvania, he summoned half a dozen or more Pennsylvania Republicans to a conference at the White House. When

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Abraham Lincoln and Men of War-Times: Some Personal Recollections of War and Politics during the Lincoln Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Introduction 7
  • Preface 17
  • Contents 21
  • List of Illustrations 25
  • Lincoln in 1860. 27
  • A Visit to Lincoln. 44
  • Lincoln's Characteristics. 72
  • Lincoln in Politics. 85
  • Lincoln and Emancipation. 98
  • Lincoln and Hamlin. 115
  • Lincoln and Chase. 132
  • Lincoln and Cameron. 147
  • Lincoln and Stanton. 170
  • Lincoln and Grant. 189
  • Lincoln and Mcclellan. 208
  • Lincoln and Sherman. 226
  • Lincoln and Curtin. 248
  • Lincoln and Stevens. 277
  • Lincoln and Greeley. 312
  • Our Unrewarded Heroes. 355
  • The Pennsylvania Reserve Corps. 423
  • Appendix. 457
  • Index. 483
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