Germany, 1947-1949: The Story in Documents

By U.S. Dept. of State | Go to book overview

Territorial Reorganization Inside Germany

ABOLITION OF THE STATE OF PRUSSIA
Control Council Law No. 46 and Excerpt from Report of Military Governor

[ February 25, 1947]

The Prussian State which from early days has been a bearer of militarism and reaction in Germany has de facto ceased to exist.

Guided by the interests of preservation of peace and security of peoples and with the desire to assure further reconstruction of the political life of Germany on a democratic basis, the Control Council enacts as follows:


Article I

The Prussian State together with its central government and all its agencies is abolished.


Article II

Territories which were a part of the Prussian State and which are at present under the supreme authority of the Control Council will receive the status of Laender or will be absorbed into Laender.

The provisions of this Article are subject to such revision and other provisions as may be agreed upon by the Allied Control Authority, or as may be laid down in the future Constitution of Germany.


Article III

The State and administrative functions as well as the assets and liabilities of the former Prussian State will be transferred to appropriate Laender, subject to such agreements as may be necessary and made by the Allied Control Authority.


Article IV

This law becomes effective on the day of its signature.

Done at Berlin on 25 February 1947.

P. KOENIG, Général d'Armée

V. SOKOLOVSKY, Marshal of the Soviet Union

LUCIUS D. CLAY for JOSEPH T. MCNARNEY, General

B. H. ROBERTSON for Sir SHOLTO DOUGLAS Marshal of the Royal Air Force

[ February 1947]

Control Council Law No. 46, signed on 25 February, liquidates the State of Prussia, its central government, and all its agencies. This law is in the nature of a confirming action; the eleven provinces and administrative districts of prewar Prussia have since the beginning of the occupation been split up among the Soviet, British, and U.S. Zones and Poland.17

____________________
17
Excerpt from Legal and Judicial Affairs ( Bimonthly Review), OMGUS Report No. 20, Jan. 1-Feb. 28, 1947.

-151-

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Germany, 1947-1949: The Story in Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface III
  • Contents V
  • Chronological List of Documents xxix
  • Basic Principles and Objectives 1
  • General Statements 3
  • Conferences 42
  • Political Developments 99
  • Demilitarization and Security 101
  • War Crimes 112
  • Frontiers 118
  • Territorial Reorganization Inside Germany 151
  • Political Structure, Law, and Administration (u. S. Area of Control) 154
  • Peace Treaty with Germany 188
  • Four-Power Occupation and Control 198
  • The Berlin Crisis 202
  • Federal Republic of Germany 319
  • Economic Developments 327
  • Elimination of German War Potential and Maintenance of Security 329
  • German Economic Rehabilitation 371
  • Educational, Informational, Cultural and Religious Developments 539
  • Education 541
  • Cultural Exchange Program 611
  • Religious Affairs 627
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