Ratio of Children to Women, 1920: A Study in the Differential Rate of Natural Increase in the United States

By Warren S. Thompson | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
Page
CHAPTER I.--Introduction1
Available birth statistics2
Method and scope of study15
CHAPTER II.--Ratios of children to women, by States18
Factors which influence population growth18
Native and foreign-born women22
Marital condition and parentage24
Women gainfully employed31
Foreign-born women33
Urbanism and birth rate36
CHAPTER III.--Ratios of children to women in cities of 100,000 inhabitants and over40
Differences between States and large cities40
Differences between cities45
Factors influencing ratios46
Occupations48
Parentage56
Employment of women57
Marriage58
Foreign-born women and "new" immigration64
Proportion of young women66
Size of city69
Masculinity69
Birth control70
Unexplained differences between cities70
CHAPTER IV.--Ratios of children to women in cities of 25,000 to 100,000 inhabitants72
Cities having highest and lowest ratios for native women72
Residential cities77
Employment of women79
Marriage80
Proportion of young women83
Cities having highest and lowest ratios for foreign-born women84
New immigration84
Heredity and the birth rate86
Summary87
CHAPTER V.--Ratios of children to women in the rural populations of the States88
Rurality of the population88
Proportion of women married94
Sex ratio95
Rural population on farms96
Farm tenancy98
Village population98
CHAPTER VI.--Ratios of children to women in cities and rural districts100
Native white women in communities of different sizes100
Marriage107
Urbanism, commercialism, and industrialism111
Foreign-born white women in communities of different sizes114
Comparisons for native white and foreign-born white121
Numerical effect of decline in city birth rate126
Reasons for differences in urban and rural ratios129

-iii-

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