Ratio of Children to Women, 1920: A Study in the Differential Rate of Natural Increase in the United States

By Warren S. Thompson | Go to book overview

IX
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

This study has shown that there are very marked differences between the ratios of children to women in various parts of the country and in different nativity groups.

In cities of over 100,000 these differences range from 234 children per 1,000 native white women in Los Angeles to 1,051 children per 1,000 foreign-born white women in Youngstown, Ohio; in cities of 25,000 to 100,000 the range is from 257 children per 1,000 native white women in Brookline, Mass., to 1,277 children per 1,000 foreign-born white women in Hamtramck, Mich.; and in the rural districts the range is from 436 children per 1,000 native white women in Rhode Island to 1,393 children per 1,000 foreign-born white women in West Virginia. Of course the majority of communities are found well within these extremes, the averages being as follows: In all cities of over 100,000 the ratio is 341 for native white women and 679 for foreign-born white women; in all cities of 25,000 to 100,000, the ratios are 390 and 766, respectively; and in the rural districts 721 and 998.

In these three comparisons we find the two chief differences in ratios to the study of which the larger part of this monograph has been devoted. They are, first, the differences in ratios of children between the native and the foreign-born women, and second, the differences between the cities and the country districts.


STATIONARY POPULATION

One meaning of these differences in ratios has been strikingly set forth by calculations of the stationary populations1 that would arise at death rates of 1920 on the supposition that the ratios in rural groups prevailed in urban groups. (See Chap. VI.) On the supposition that the 8,032,720 native white women 20 to 44 years of age living in cities (places of over 2,500 inhabitants) and having a ratio of 388, had the same ratio of children, that is 721, as the native white women in the rural districts, the city women would have had 2,674,645 more children than they did have and this number of

____________________
1
As already explained, by "stationary population" is meant a population which remains at a given number under certain conditions. Then conditions are that a certain death rate remains fixed and that a definite number of births occur annually. Thus if the death rates for each age prevailing in 1920 are used we find that out of 100,000 white males born at a given time, 91,567 will be alive one year later, 89,957 will be alive at the and of the second year, and soon until all are dead. The sum of those surviving at each year of age from 100,000 births annually constitutes the stationary population arising under these conditions. By hypothesis, the deaths equal the births in this population and there is neither increase nor decrease. With any given number of births annually, the number of people that would ultimately be alive, when births just equaled deaths, at any given death rate, 1920, for example, can be calculated, and that is what we have done here.

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ratio of Children to Women, 1920: A Study in the Differential Rate of Natural Increase in the United States
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.