The Roman Stage: A Short History of Latin Drama in the Time of the Republic

By W. Beare | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
CHAPTER PAGE
I. INTRODUCTION1
II. DANCE AND DRAMA: THE PRE-LITERARY PERIOD IN ITALY9
III. LIVIUS ANDRONICUS AND THE COMING OF LITERARY DRAMA TO ROME15
IV. NAEVIUS23
V. PLAUTUS : LIFE AND LIST OF PLAYS35
VI. GREEK NEW COMEDY40
VII. THE FAMOUS PLAYS OF PLAUTUS46
VIII. PLAUTUS : TREATMENT OF HIS ORIGINALS53
IX. THE GENERAL CHARACTER OF ROMAN TRAGEDY60
X. PACUVIUS69
XI. COMEDY AFTER THE DEATH OF PLAUTUS75
XII. TERENCE81
XIII. THE OTHER COMPOSERS OF PALLIATAE105
XIV. ACCIUS111
XV. NATIVE COMEDY: THE FABULA TOGATA120
XVI. POPULAR FARCE: THE FABULA ATELLANA129
XVII. THE LITERARY ATELLANA135
XVIII. THE MIME141
XIX. THE LATIN PROLOGUES AND THEIR VALUE AS EVIDENCE FOR THEATRICAL CONDITIONS151
XX. THE ORGANIZATION OF THE ROMAN THEATRE156
XXI. SEATS IN THE ROMAN THEATRE163
XXII. THE SPECTATORS165
XXIII. THE STAGE AND THE ACTORS' HOUSE168
XXIV. COSTUMES AND MASKS176
XXV. THE ROMAN ORIGIN OF THE LAW OF FIVE ACTS188
XXVI. MUSIC AND METRE211
XXVII. EPILOGUE: DRAMA UNDER THE EMPIRE225

-ix-

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