Civil Rights in the United States

By Alison Reppy | Go to book overview

CIVIL RIGHTS IN THE UNITED STATES

CHAPTER I
Introduction

DURING the past biennial period the world-wide battle to preserve and extend civil liberty was not fought upon the battlefields nor in the courts, but for the most part it was waged on the diplomatic front, in legislative halls, in the field of executive administration, and on the political platform.

On the international scene the parallel expansion of Soviet Russia and Soviet Communism, coupled with threats of war and rumors of war, have produced great uncertainty as to the status of civil rights all over the world.1 But in spite of these unhappy developments, some progress may be reported. The Human Rights Commission adopted a Declaration of Human Rights,2 which may become a great moral force in framing future covenants enforceable by the United Nations. Of related interest was the adoption by

____________________
1
As to the situation domestically, see Pamphlet published by the American Civil Liberties Union, OUR UNCERTAIN LIBERTIES, New York, 1948, p. 1. See also, IN THE SHADOW OF FEAR, American Civil Liberties Union, New York, 1948- 1949. As to the situation abroad, see N. Y. Times, March 4, 1949, p. 20, col. 2.
2
The movement seemed contagious. See articles on "The Case for a Canadian Bill of Rights" 26 Can. B. Rev. 759 ( 1948). See also, Scott, "Dominion Jurisdiction Over Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms" 27 Can. B. Rev.498 ( 1949). For the latest developments with reference to a Universal Declaration of Human Rights, see N. Y. Herald Tribune, Dec. 8, 1949, p. 32, col. 1.

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