Civil Rights in the United States

By Alison Reppy | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
Conclusion

As the period under survey closes it appears that the future of human rights on the international scene is characterized by even greater uncertainty than at the beginning as a result of the North Korean aggressive invasion of South Korea, which has produced grave apprehension the world around.

Domestically, the President's Program on Civil Rights still remains to be carried into execution, the investigative action of the Un-American Activities Committee has declined or is less in the public attention, while the campaign against communism in all its forms is being aggressively waged by the national government, as evidenced by the recent withdrawal of bail granted to Harry Bridges, and the suggestion of similar action in the case of the eleven convicted communists now out of jail on bail, pending a review of their conviction by the Supreme Court. Moreover, it now seems likely that the proposals to outlaw the Communist Party or to place severe restrictions on its activities as well as the activities of individual communists or fellow-travelers will find some form of legislative expression in the McCarran Bill, though perhaps in a modified form. On the judicial side the Supreme Court found itself confronted with many cases involving civil rights, but the emphasis of these cases fell in the field of group discrimination as applied to education and transportation.

The struggle for supremacy between the civil and military authorities showed signs of subsidence, although it is still not certain whether the custody and control of the atomic bomb is to be in the hands of the Atomic Energy Commission or the Armed Services. The Universal Military Training Bill gave way to the Selective Draft Bill, but the Korean development has produced an increased demand

-251-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Civil Rights in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.