A Source Book of American Political Theory

By Benjamin Fletcher Wright Jr. | Go to book overview
Nor have We been wanting in attention to our British brethren. We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which, would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, Enemies in War, in Peace Friends.We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the Protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our Sacred Honor.
REFERENCES
R. G. ADAMS, Political Ideas of the American Revolution ( 1922).
C. BECKER, The Declaration of Independence ( 1922).
M. D. CONWAY, The Life of Thomas Paine ( 2 vols., 1892).
L. B. DUNBAR, A Study of "Monarchical" Tendencies in the United States, from 1776 to 1801. ( 1922).
W. A. DUNNING, Political Theories, Rousseau to Spencer ( 1920).
H. E. EGERTON, The Causes and Character of the American Revolution ( 1923).
R. G. GETTELL, History of American Political Thought ( 1928).
R. FROTHINGHAM, Rise of the Republic of the United States ( 1872).
J. F. JAMESON, The American Revolution Considered as a Social Movement ( 1926).
Journals of the Continental Congress, edited by W. C. FORD (25 vols., 1904- 1922).

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A Source Book of American Political Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I the Theocratic Ideal in Early New England 1
  • References 40
  • Chapter II Constitutional Protest and Revolution 41
  • References 114
  • Chapter III State Constitution Making During the Revolution 116
  • References 173
  • Chapter IV the Framing and Ratification of the Federal Constitution 174
  • References 276
  • Chapter V Under the New Constitution 277
  • References 366
  • Chapter VI the Growth of Constitutional Democracy 367
  • References 431
  • Chapter VII the Slavery Controversy 432
  • References 477
  • Chapter VIII the Struggle for State Sovereignty 478
  • References 544
  • Chapter IX Some Recent Tendencies 545
  • References 642
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