American Philosophy Today and Tomorrow

By Horace M. Kallen; Sidney Hook | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

This book presents the views of twenty-five representative American thinkers on the problems with which the times confront the American as philosopher, and the solutions which Americans must find for tomorrow. The contributors are men living and working in all the diverse areas of the American scene--in Texas, in California, in the Middle West, in New England, in the Atlantic States. Few live where they were born and grew up; many follow vocations for which they were not trained and perhaps did not intend to seek. All but one or two have passed through the formal discipline in philosophy of the schools; they are "doctors of philosophy"; and most of them earn their livings by teaching philosophy or psychology in one or another of the institutions of higher learning of the land. But some have employed their philosophic training in the service of disciplines not strictly philosophic, such as education or economics; others have turned their training to non-pedagogical uses, such as literature, public service, the law, the labor movement, religion, politics, and racial betterment; several have combined academic teaching with these non-academic interests. Thus the volume derives directly not alone from the intrinsic interests of the philosophical discipline as such, but equally direct experience with major preoccupations of the national life also enters into the making of whatever message it conveys.

This message may or may not have been uttered before; but the younger generation of American philosophers who figure most numerously in the pages of this book have not elsewhere made public their philosophic credos.1

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1

Exigencies of space have compelled the editors to restrict the contributors only to those who have not published philosophic self-portraits before. For an account of the "pre-depression philosophy" of those who

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American Philosophy Today and Tomorrow
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Contents vii
  • The Humanization Of Philosophy 1
  • The Gospel Of Technology 23
  • Toward A Social Philosophy 43
  • The Great American Dream 63
  • The Socialization Of Morality 81
  • A Philosopher Among The Metaphysicians 99
  • An Amateur's Philosophy 115
  • The Naturalistic Temper 137
  • The New Task Of Philosophy 153
  • The Whimsical Condition Of Social Psychology, And of Mankind 169
  • Experimental Naturalism 203
  • Toward Radical Empiricism In Ethics 227
  • Philosophy Today And Tomorrow 249
  • The Ontological Status of Value 273
  • Values and Imperatives 311
  • An Amateur's Search For Significance 335
  • A Program - For a Philosophy 355
  • Toward a Naturalistic Conception of Logic 375
  • The Plight of Philosophy 393
  • Historical Naturalism 409
  • Political Morality 433
  • The Task Of Present-Day Metaphysics 447
  • Truth Beyond Imagination 463
  • A Memorandum for A System of Philosophy 487
  • A Catholic's View 499
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