Two Postwar Recoveries of the German Economy

By Horst Mendershausen | Go to book overview

II. NOTES ON THE TWO READJUSTMENT PERIODS

The German people brought to their two postwar trials much experience in economic adaptation. Their economy was a highly dynamic one. It looked back on a record of tremendous changes in organization and performance, geographic and technological structure, all compressed into such short spans of time as about half a century by the outbreak of War I, and two further decades by War II. The war years themselves had been times of convulsive change and strain. Economic progress in the past had been bought with hard labor and inventive genius -- and with economic insecurity and failures. The fate of the defeated and impoverished had its historical precedents in the fate of the "freed" peasant, the dislodged artisan and small tradesmen, within the last two or three generations. And hope for another turn for the better could lean on that hard, disciplined work and enterprising ingenuity that had won fruits in the past. Thus, uninviting as the circumstances were that had to be met after the wars, they did not appear to the Germans as unmanageable as they would have to a people accustomed to a more static economy. There soon emerged a general will to go to work and meet the circumstances.

Nevertheless, one cannot but marvel at the recuperative power of the stricken economy. Did it spring from its own resources, or from external help and guidance? To what extent was it impeded, and to what extent nourished, by the loss of resources in the wars? In what follows we shall consider briefly three subjects that have a bearing on these questions: first, some differences in the international political setting; secondly, certain features of the governmental framework in Germany at the end of the two wars; and thirdly, the two inflations.

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Two Postwar Recoveries of the German Economy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contributions To Economic Analysis Viii iv
  • Title Page v
  • Introduction to the Series viii
  • Preface ix
  • Table of Contents xi
  • Introduction Comparing Two Periods of Economic Change 1
  • I- Review of Production, Income, And Trade 5
  • II- Notes on the Two Readjustment Periods 19
  • III- Economic Growth in Two Deployment Periods 45
  • Iv. Internal Economic Balance 59
  • V- International Economic Integration 92
  • Summary 119
  • Index 129
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 136

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.