Speech Criticism, the Development of Standards for Rhetorical Appraisal

By Lester Thonssen; A. Craig Baird | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abernathy, Elton, 293
Academics, 181
Accusation, use in enthymemes, 68
Action, in delivery, 441-443 (See "Delivery")
Adams, James Truslow, 11
on oratory of Sam Adams, 368
Adams, John, Choate on oratory of, 303
Adams, John Quincy, 339
Adams, Sam, J. T. Adams' estimate of, 368
Addison, Joseph,
on delivery, 128
on oratorical action, 211-212
Aeschines, 31, 40, 43, 44, 97, 155, 170, 171, 199, 202, 205, 218, 236, 237, 255, 408
Affectation, Sheridan on elocutionary, 129
Against the Sophists ( Isocrates), 46, 48
Alcibiades, Plutarch compares Demosthenes with, 200
Alcuin, 51, 110
Alderman, Edwin A., 285
Allegory, defined, 420
Allport, Floyd, and theory of social facilitation, 324
Aly, Bower, 284
Ambrose, 113
American Eloquence ( Moore), 271
"American Taxation" ( Burke), 397, 458
Ammon, George, 105
Amplification,
Longinus on, 108
Wilson on, 118-119
Anacoenosis, defined, 422
Analogy,
argument from, 349
use in enthymemes, 67
Analysis,
emotional, 357-382
ethical, 383-391
logical, 331-356
(See also "Emotional proof," "Ethical proof," and "Logical proof")
Analytic criticism, defined, 17-18
Anastrophe, defined, 422
Ancients vs. moderns controversy,
Brougham on, 233-238
Cicero on, 152-157
Quintilian on, 187-195
(See also "Atticism vs. Asianism")
Anderson, Dorothy, 293
Andocides, 40, 41, 42, 170, 199, 255
his speech "On the Mysteries,"258-259
on authenticity of speech "On the Peace," 305
Angle, Paul M., on Lincoln's texts, 306, 307
Annual Register, 337
Antidosis ( Isocrates), 46, 47, 48
Antimachus, 50
Antiphon, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 170, 255, 301
Jebb on, 256-257
Plutarch on, 199
representative of austere style, 106
Antisthenes, 181
Antitheta ( Bacon), 123
Antonius, Marcus, 82, 83, 163, 164, 442, 444
Aper, Marcus, 102
Apollonius, 97
Apology ( Plato), 46
Apophasis, defined, 422
Apophthegmes ( Bacon), 123
Aporia, defined, 421
Aposiopesis, defined, 421
Apostrophe, defined, 422
Appropriateness, in style, 414-416
Arcadian Rhetorike ( Fraunce), 125
Arcesilas, relation to New Academy, 181
Archidamus, 32
Archidamus ( Isocrates), 45
Areas of inquiry, rhetorical, 289-296
Areopagiticus ( Isocrates), 45
Argument,
appraisal of, 341-350
in Homeric epics, 30
its part in criticism, 13-14
(See also "Logical proof")
"Argument from the Point of View of Sociology" ( Yost), 376
Aristeides, 203
Aristotle,
analysis of emotion of envy, 61-62
as critic, 150
Bacon's reference to, 124
Cicero's reliance upon, 90
comparison of his teaching with Isocrates', 44
definition of rhetoric, 6, 58-59
distinguishes between artistic and inartistic proof, 59
emphasis upon deliberative speaking, 58
emphasis upon invention, 79
emphasis upon logical proof, 331
Gibbons' reliance upon, 125
his point of view, 150
on audience, 321
on audience analysis, 60-63
on delivery, 69, 434
on disposition, 70, 398, 399, 400
on emotional proof, 60-63, 358, 359, 362, 366, 372, 373, 382
on enthymemes, 65
on ethical proof, 383, 384, 385, 386
on examples, 65
on function of audience, 60
on function of oratory, 102
on golden mean, 72-74, 432
on kinds of proof, 59-60
on kinds of style, 89
on logical proof, 60, 63-69
on memory, 80
on probability, 35
on proportion, 72-74
on relation of philosophy to rhetoric, 180
on style, 69-70, 412, 415, 416, 419, 426
on the topics, 60, 63-65

-527-

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