Frontenac, Louis de Buade, comte de Palluau et de

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.

Frontenac, Louis de Buade, comte de Palluau et de

Louis de Buade Frontenac, comte de Palluau et de (frŏn´tĬnăk, Fr. lwē büäd´ koNt pälüō´ ā frôNtənäk´), 1620–98, French governor of New France. His early military career was spent in service in the Low Countries, Italy, and Germany. Appointed in 1672 to the post in New France, he entered with vigor upon a course that would have resulted in considerable political independence for Canada. His policy was not acceptable to Louis XIV and to his minister Jean Colbert, and, adding to the power of the council in New France, they reduced that of the governor. Frontenac was embroiled in quarrels with the Jesuits, with the intendant, and with the governor of Montreal, but he tried to develop new policies toward the indigenous peoples, forwarded explorations by Louis Jolliet, Jacques Marquette, and the sieur de La Salle, and aided in the establishment of forts and posts in the new French territory. When disagreements among the heads of the colony caused division and confusion, Frontenac was recalled (1682) to France. During the following years, however, the Iroquois became increasingly aggressive, and his successors, Joseph de La Barre and the marquis de Denonville, failed to resolve New France's problems; Frontenac was therefore returned to Canada as governor in 1689. He energetically warred against the Iroquois until they were subdued in 1696, and he held Quebec against the British in the first of the French and Indian Wars. Under him, French forces drove Sir William Phips's fleet from Quebec, Boston was attacked, and raids were made on the British coast as far south as New Jersey. His leadership during the war with the British enabled the French to maintain the status quo in New France until the signing of the Treaty of Ryswick (1697) ended the war.

See biography by W. D. Le Sueur (1926, repr. 1964); study by F. Parkman (1902, repr. 1969).

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Frontenac, Louis de Buade, comte de Palluau et de
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.