Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.

Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts

Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, in central Manhattan, New York City, between 62d and 66th streets W of Broadway. Lincoln Center is both a complex of buildings and the arts organizations that reside there. Between 1959 and 1972 the Metropolitan Opera, Avery Fisher Hall, the David H. Koch Theater, the Juilliard School (including Alice Tully Hall for recitals and a chamber music hall), the Vivian Beaumont Theater, the Library-Museum of the Performing Arts, the Guggenheim Bandshell in Damrosch Park, and several Fordham buildings were constructed on several sites. Among those selected to design the buildings were the architects W. K. Harrison, Eero Saarinen, Philip Johnson, and Max Abramowitz, and the stage designer Jo Mielziner. A 28-story tower with dormitory rooms, rehearsal studios, a movie theater, and other facilities was added to the complex in 1991. Frederick P. Rose Hall, designed by Rafael Viñoly and located at the nearby Time Warner Center, has housed the jazz division since 2004, and a significantly revamped Alice Tully Hall, designed by Diller Scofidio & Renfro, opened in 2009. The Claire Tow Theater, a small, intimate venue designed by Hugh Hardy and perched atop the Beaumont Theater, opened in 2012.

There are 11 resident constituent organizations that comprise Lincoln Center. Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Inc., a nonprofit organization with municipal support, manages the Center's campus and presents some 5,000 performances and 3,000 artists there annually; the Lincoln Center Institute is its educational arm. The other member institutions are the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, the Film Society of Lincoln Center, Jazz at Lincoln Center, the Juilliard School, the Lincoln Center Theater, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet, the New York Philharmonic, the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, and the School of American Ballet.

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