Mondavi, Robert Gerald

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.

Mondavi, Robert Gerald

Robert Gerald Mondavi (məndä´vē), 1913–2008, American vintner who was in the forefront of establishing California as a major table-wine-producing region and wine as a staple of the American table, b. Hibbing, Minn., grad Stanford (1936). His Italian immigrant family moved to Lodi, Calif., then America's wine-grape capital, in 1923. Mondavi worked in a winery after college, and in 1943 his family bought a Napa Valley winery, which was run by Mondavi and his brother. He left the family business in 1965 and the following year established his own winery in the Napa Valley. Determined to improve the pedestrian quality of domestic wines, he introduced a number of European techniques to American wine production, e.g., fermentation in stainless-steel tank and aging in French oak barrels. He and his sons also developed and introduced outstanding new wines, and partnered with international winemakers, most notably founding the high-quality Opus One winery with Baron Philippe de Rothschild. Mondavi also helped make the Napa Valley a major tourist center. Extensive borrowing forced his company to go public in 1993; Mondavi retired from the business in 2004.

See his autobiography (1998); C. Ray, Robert Mondavi of the Napa Valley (1984), O. Torrès, The Wine Wars (2006); J. G. Silver, The House of Mondavi (2007).

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mondavi, Robert Gerald
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.