Presidents of the United States ( (table))

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.

Presidents of the United States ( (table))

Presidents of the United States

Presidents of the United States
President Political Party Dates in Office Vice President(s)
George Washington   1789–97 John Adams
John Adams Federalist 1797–1801 Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson Democratic-Republican 1801–9 Aaron Burr, 1801–5 George Clinton, 1805–9
James Madison Democratic-Republican 1809–17 George Clinton, 1809–12 (no Vice President, Apr., 1812–Mar., 1813) Elbridge Gerry, 1813–14 (no Vice President, Nov., 1814–Mar., 1817)
James Monroe Democratic-Republican 1817–25 Daniel D. Tompkins
John Quincy Adams Democratic-Republican 1825–29 John C. Calhoun
Andrew Jackson Democratic 1829–37 John C. Calhoun, 1829–32 (no Vice President, Dec., 1832–Mar., 1833) Martin Van Buren, 1833–37
Martin Van Buren Democratic 1837–41 Richard M. Johnson
William Henry Harrison Whig 1841 John Tyler
John Tyler Whig 1841–45 (no Vice President)
James Knox Polk Democratic 1845–49 George M. Dallas
Zachary Taylor Whig 1849–50 Millard Fillmore
Millard Fillmore Whig 1850–53 (no Vice President)
Franklin Pierce Democratic 1853–57 William R. King, 1853 (no Vice President, Apr., 1853–Mar., 1857)
James Buchanan Democratic 1857–61 John C. Breckinridge
Abraham Lincoln Republican 1861–65 Hannibal Hamlin, 1861–65 Andrew Johnson, 1865
Andrew Johnson Democratic/National Union 1865–69 (no Vice President)
Ulysses Simpson Grant Republican 1869–77 Schuyler Colfax, 1869–73 Henry Wilson, 1873–75 (no Vice President, Nov., 1875–Mar., 1877)
Rutherford Birchard Hayes Republican 1877–81 William A. Wheeler
James Abram Garfield Republican 1881 Chester A. Arthur
Chester Alan Arthur Republican 1881–85 (no Vice President)
Grover Cleveland Democratic 1885–89 Thomas A. Hendricks, 1885 (no Vice President, Nov., 1885–Mar., 1889)
Benjamin Harrison Republican 1889–93 Levi P. Morton
Grover Cleveland Democratic 1893–97 Adlai E. Stevenson
William McKinley Republican 1897–1901 Garret A. Hobart, 1897–99 (no Vice President, Nov., 1899–Mar., 1901) Theodore Roosevelt, 1901
Theodore Roosevelt Republican 1901–9 (no Vice President, Sept., 1901–Mar., 1905) Charles W. Fairbanks, 1905–9
William Howard Taft Republican 1909–13 James S. Sherman, 1909–12 (no Vice President, Oct., 1912–Mar., 1913)
Woodrow Wilson Democratic 1913–21 Thomas R. Marshall
Warren Gamaliel Harding Republican 1921–23 Calvin Coolidge
Calvin Coolidge Republican 1923–29 (no Vice President, 1923–25) Charles G. Dawes, 1925–29
Herbert Clark Hoover Republican 1929–33 Charles Curtis
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Democratic 1933–45 John N. Garner, 1933–41 Henry A. Wallace, 1941–45 Harry S. Truman, 1945
Harry S. Truman Democratic 1945–53 (no Vice President, 1945–49) Alben W. Barkley, 1949–53
Dwight David Eisenhower Republican 1953–61 Richard M. Nixon
John Fitzgerald Kennedy Democratic 1961–63 Lyndon B. Johnson
Lyndon Baines Johnson Democratic 1963–69 (no Vice President, 1963–65) Hubert H. Humphrey, 1965–69
Richard Milhous Nixon Republican 1969–74 Spiro T. Agnew, 1969–73 (no Vice President, Oct. 10, 1973–Dec. 6, 1973) Gerald R. Ford, 1973–74
Gerald Rudolph Ford Republican 1974–77 (no Vice President, Aug. 9, 1974–Dec. 19, 1974) Nelson A. Rockefeller, 1974–77
Jimmy Carter Democratic 1977–81 Walter F. Mondale
Ronald Wilson Reagan Republican 1981–89 George H.W. Bush
George Herbert Walker Bush Republican 1989–93 J. Danforth Quayle
Bill Clinton Democratic 1993–2001 Albert Gore, Jr.
George Walker Bush Republican 2001–9 Dick Cheney
Barack Hussein Obama Democratic 2009– Joseph R. Biden, Jr.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Presidents of the United States ( (table))
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.