stealth technology

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.

stealth technology

stealth technology, designs and materials engineered for the military purpose of avoiding detection by radar or any other electronic system. Stealth, or antidetection, technology is applied to vehicles (e.g., tanks), missiles, ships, and aircraft with the goal of making the object more difficult to detect at closer and closer ranges. Since radar is the most difficult form of detection to elude, avoidance is generally accomplished by reducing the radar cross section (RCS) of the object to within the level of background noise; for example, the reported goal of U.S. military designers is to make a fighter plane with an RCS the size of a bird. The RCS is the area of an imaginary perfect reflector that would reflect the same amount of energy back to the receiving radar antenna as does the actual target, which may be much larger or even smaller than the RCS. A pickup truck, for example, with its flat surfaces and sharp edges has an RCS of approximately 200 sq m, but a smooth-edged fighter jet has an RCS of only 2 to 4 sq m. The RCS of any given object, however, differs at various angles and radar frequencies. Much about stealth technology remains classified, but among the antidetection techniques used in the U.S. Air Force F-117A Stealth fighter (now retired) and B-2 bomber were a low profile with no flat surfaces to reflect radar directly back, the intensive substitution of radar opaque composites in place of metals, and an overall coating of radar absorbing material. The implementation of stealth technology may require such compromises as reduced payload capacity, aerodynamic instability, and high design, production, and maintenance expenses. More recently, stealth technology has been incorporated into planes with a more traditional appearance than the F-117, such as the U.S. F-22 Raptor and the Russian-Indian Sukhoi T-50 fighters. China also is developing stealth aircraft.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

stealth technology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.