National Recreation and Park Association Reference Guide

Parks & Recreation, March 2003 | Go to article overview

National Recreation and Park Association Reference Guide


MISSION, VALUES AND GOALS

NRPA's Mission: To advance parks, recreation and environmental conservation efforts that enhance the quality of life for all people.

NRPA's Values: The membership is dedicated to achieving this mission with commonly held values and beliefs. We believe that parks and recreation:

* Enhances the human potential through the provision of facilities, services and programs that meet human emotional, social and physical needs.

* Articulates environmental values through ecologically responsible management and environmental education programs.

* Promotes individual and community wellness to enhance the quality of life for all citizens.

* Utilizes holistic approaches to promote cultural understanding, economic development, family unit and public health and safety, by working in coalitions and partnerships with allied organizations.

* Facilitates and promotes the development of grassroots, self-help initiatives in communities across the country.

NRPA's Goals: In order to carry out its mission, the association has reaffirmed the following previously adopted goals. These goals broadly define the types of services the association offers to its members and to the public at large.

* To promote public awareness and support for recreation, park and leisure services as they relate to the constructive use of leisure and thereby to the social stability of a community and the physical and mental health of the individual. NRPA also strives to promote public awareness of the environmental and natural resource management aspects of recreation and leisure services.

* To facilitate the development, maintenance expansion and improvement of socially and environmentally relevant public policy for recreation, parks and leisure.

* To enhance professional development and to provide services that contribute to the development of NRPA members.

* To promote the development and dissemination of the body of knowledge in order to improve the delivery of service, increase understanding of leisure behavior and expand the body of knowledge relative to natural resource and environmental management.

History: NRPA's heritage and philosophy are an outgrowth of pioneering work by its predecessors-the American Institute of Park Executives (1898), the National Recreation Association (1906), the National Conference on State Parks (1921), and the American Recreation Society (1937). The history of NRPA is a history of parks and scenic open spaces. It is the story of children and people of all ages seeking self-expression and fulfillment in an urbanized and industrial society. It is the story of visionary men and women who believed in the importance of recreation to the growth and development of the individual and the nation. It is the story of providing sustainable programs and environments for generations to come.

Board of Trustees

Board of Trustees Staff Liaison Laura Garcia Hacek, 703-858-2142, lhacek@nrpa.org

The National Recreation and Park Association is governed by a Board of Trustees comprised of both citizens and professionals who represent the diverse interests, areas and disciplines within the park and recreation industry. Board members are elected to three-year terms, while officers of the Board are elected annually. Board members are representative of the NRPA membership which includes: professional and citizen leaders in the park, recreation, and conservation movement; park and recreation agencies and organizations representing the public, private, voluntary, commercial and industrial sectors; firms supplying park and recreation products and services; and individuals and civic groups interested in the park, recreation and conservation field. The Board is responsible for the formulation of policies that control and direct the affairs of NRPA.

BRANCHES & SECTIONS

To adequately serve its diverse membership constituency, NRPA has constitutionally chartered branches that meet the particular needs and concerns of the broad variety of interest areas in the park and recreation field. …

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