Light of Our Lives; Scientist's Life-After- Death Claim Could Eventually Prove Existence of the Human Soul

By Martell, Peter | Daily Mail (London), April 19, 2003 | Go to article overview

Light of Our Lives; Scientist's Life-After- Death Claim Could Eventually Prove Existence of the Human Soul


Martell, Peter, Daily Mail (London)


Byline: PETER MARTELL

IT is a fundamental question with which the world's greatest thinkers have been wrestling for centuries.

But now it seems to have been answered by a scientist who claims to have uncovered evidence which suggests there really is life after death.

And out-of-body experiences could soon be made available to order after similar research in Switzerland managed to give a live patient the feeling of leaving the body and moving towards a bright light.

Today, at a lecture for the Edinburgh International Science Festival, Professor Robert Morris will go even further and suggest that human awareness of the world can exist independently of the brain, even when someone is clinically dead.

Professor Morris, who holds the Koestler chair of parapsychology at Edinburgh University, has been leading research by four of the world's top experts on out- of-body experiences affecting people on the verge of death.

The controversial new research suggests consciousness can survive even after the brain and heart stop working.

If the scientists are proved right, the fundamentals of psychology, philosophy and neuroscience will have to be radically rethought.

Professor Morris said: 'The evidence suggests that the consciousness can exist separately from the brain. These out- of- body experiences are far more common than people might think.

'Between 10 per cent and 15 per cent of people across the world have experienced the strange sensation of floating outside their own body. ' Experts believe that proving we can still think and be aware of the world around us, independent of our brain and outside our body, seems close to proof we have a soul.

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