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Call for Manuscripts for the October 2004 Focus Issue: Teaching Mathematics to Special Needs Students

Teaching Children Mathematics, May 2003 | Go to article overview

Call for Manuscripts for the October 2004 Focus Issue: Teaching Mathematics to Special Needs Students


The October 2004 issue of Teaching Children Mathematics (TCM) will focus on teaching mathematics to special needs students. This focus topic reflects the recommendation in NCTM's Principles and Standards for School Mathematics that "all students should have access to an excellent and equitable mathematics program that provides solid support for their learning and is responsive to their prior knowledge, intellectual strengths, and personal interests" (p. 13). As many schools embrace the vision of inclusion, teachers are being called upon to adapt their methods to meet the special needs of a wide range of students. These needs may include, but are not limited to, students with learning, physical, emotional, or language challenges who require special attention in mathematics instruction, as well as students in gifted programs who need enriched mathematics instruction.

By highlighting the challenges and rewards of teaching mathematics to special needs students, the Editorial Panel hopes to provide teachers and teacher educators with resources to assist them in their efforts to reach all students mathematically. We hope to share examples from instructional and research endeavors that identify both the challenges and the achievements of teaching mathematics to students with special needs. We also hope that this focus issue will sustain a dialogue within the mathematics education community about how to make the vision of Principles and Standards for School Mathematics a reality for all students. We invite authors to share their classroom experiences and their ideas. Interdisciplinary co-authorship is encouraged. The focus of an article may be selected from the following topics and questions, although an article may incorporate components from more than one heading. Manuscripts that address related issues also are welcome.

Identifying the Mathematical Needs of Special Groups

* How do students with special needs think about various mathematical ideas and concepts?

* Which mathematical topics pose a greater challenge to special needs students?

* How can educators identify the mathematical strengths and weaknesses of special needs students?

* How can early intervention programs assist teachers with implementing inclusion programs?

Instructional and Management Strategies

* What strategies can teachers use to modify the mathematics curriculum for special needs students?

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Call for Manuscripts for the October 2004 Focus Issue: Teaching Mathematics to Special Needs Students
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