Homes Tour Back; Architecture, History on Display

By Strickland, Sandy | The Florida Times Union, April 26, 2003 | Go to article overview

Homes Tour Back; Architecture, History on Display


Strickland, Sandy, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Sandy Strickland, Staff writer

A former boarding house for British women, an old country store, a home with an elevator believed to have come from Cohen's famed downtown store and a 90-year-old Colonial Revival residence with three cast-iron tubs are sites on Riverside Avondale Preservation's home tour this year.

The 29th annual event is on tap from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and noon to 5 p.m. tomorrow.

This year's edition is showcasing eight homes and apartments, an office and a church.

"Once again, we are featuring the diverse architecture of our beautiful urban neighborhood," said Bonnie Grissett, RAP executive director.

Various architectural styles that were popular nationally were built in Riverside, ranging from Colonial to Tudor to Italianate to Mediterranean Revival, Grissett said.

RAP began the tours as a fund-raising tool and way to show off the area's assets. Tickets are $15 and can be purchased at tour locations. Here's the lineup:

-- 1520 Barrs St., this home served as a boarding house for British women in the 1930s and as an elegant teahouse and antique store until 1999. Though unconfirmed, there are rumors that singer Pat Boone's grandfather once owned the 3,500-square-foot home. Built in 1910, it features a large veranda and tapered columns.

-- St. Luke's Metropolitan Church, 1140 McDuff Ave., the 300-seat church has housed various congregations but has been home to St. Luke's since 1995. In November, the congregation approved a $140,000 renovation to upgrade the heating and air-conditioning systems, install new signage, improve the courtyard and refinish the sanctuary floor.

-- 1833 Willowbranch Terrace, this 5,100-square-foot home on Willowbranch Creek was built in 1926. The two-story brick residence has an original Art Deco bar, dining room with three sets of French doors, master suite with two walk-in closets and a gourmet kitchen. Of note is an Otis elevator believed to have come from Cohen's Duval Street store, now occupied by City Hall. The grounds are landscaped with native plants and 11 oak trees.

-- 1822 Edgewood Ave., this Tudor and Jacobethan Revival-styled mansion was built in 1927 and has more than 5,300 square feet over three stories.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Homes Tour Back; Architecture, History on Display
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.