Do You Remember?: Friday Nostalgia: Service Stations Are a Few Sandwiches Short of a Picnic

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), May 2, 2003 | Go to article overview

Do You Remember?: Friday Nostalgia: Service Stations Are a Few Sandwiches Short of a Picnic


ONCE upon a time, not so long ago, parents would take their children out on a very British ritual - a picnic.

They would drive along the new, open tarmac roads that cut their way through the heart of the countryside until they spotted a nice grassy spot. They would pull over, park the car and clamber up the short hill to a comfortable, sunblessed patch with an enviable view across rolling fields.

They would lay out their rug and unpack the hamper containing the obligatory boiled eggs, chicken drumsticks and ever-so-slightly warm cheeseand-pickle sandwiches Then the government started showing adverts warning families, excited by the novelty of the new M1, that the grass banks on either side were not picnic spots, nor was the hard shoulder a convenient parking lot for children who got caught short on the novel journey.

And, from there, our love-hate relationship with motorway service stations blossomed.

The sight of a picnicking family, pitching up on the outskirts of a service station amid the diesel fumes of trucks and coaches, instead of the motorway's grassy verges, is now as rare as a value-for-money cup of tea in the cafeteria.

For, as soon as the first section of the M1 was complete - the southern section stretching from St Albans to Birmingham was opened in 1959 - and the first service stations started springing up, we resigned ourselves to picnicking indoors on overpriced snacks in what were little more than large car parks. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Do You Remember?: Friday Nostalgia: Service Stations Are a Few Sandwiches Short of a Picnic
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.