The Appearance to the Disciples in Jerusalem; Luke 24:35-48

Manila Bulletin, May 3, 2003 | Go to article overview
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The Appearance to the Disciples in Jerusalem; Luke 24:35-48


THE two disciples recounted what had taken place on the road to Emmaus and how Jesus was made known to them in the breaking of the bread.

While they were still speaking about this, Jesus stood in their midst and said to them, "Peace be with you." But they were startled and terrified and thought that they were seeing a ghost. Then He said to them, "Why are you troubled? And why do questions arise in your hearts? Look at My hands and My feet, that it is I myself. Touch Me and see, because a ghost does not have flesh and bones as you can see I have." And as He said this, He showed them His hands and His feet. While they were still incredulous for joy and were amazed, He asked them, "Have you anything here to eat?" They gave Him a piece of baked fish; He took it and ate it in front of them. He said to them, "These are My words that I spoke to you while I was still with you, that everything written about Me in the law of Moses and in the prophets and Psalms must be fulfilled." Then He opened their minds to understand the scriptures. And He said to them, "Thus it is written that the Messiah would suffer and rise from the dead on the third day and that repentance, for the forgiveness of sins, would be preached in His name to all the nations, beginning from Jerusalem. You are witnesses of these things."

The WORD Today

There is a point in the retina which is not sensitive to light; it is where the optic nerve passes through the inner coat of the eyeball. That point is called the blind spot. By analogy, this expression is extended to any given area which cannot be seen or reached with available equipment, such as a radar beam or a radio receptor. Always by analogy, the expression blind spot is applied to an area of human experience in which one fails to exercise understanding, judgment, or discrimination.

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