Summer's New Wave: When You Reach the Final Page of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Don't Despair: There's a Tidal Wave of Other Noteworthy Books Coming out This Summer. Keep Cool with These 47 Picks

Book, May-June 2003 | Go to article overview

Summer's New Wave: When You Reach the Final Page of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Don't Despair: There's a Tidal Wave of Other Noteworthy Books Coming out This Summer. Keep Cool with These 47 Picks


FICTION

That master chronicler of New York's sexually indiscreet bourgeoisie, Candace Bushnell, plays to her strengths in Trading Up (July). This time, the Sex and the City author portrays the shopping and dating habits of one Janey Wilcox, an upwardly mobile lingerie model whose taste for expensive clothes and wealthy men leads to her downfall--and a reassessment of her priorities.

* The three thirtysomething heroines of Jane Green's Babyville (May) grapple with something scarier than singlehood: motherhood. Julia wants a kid, but her boyfriend doesn't; careerist Maeve has no plans for her uterus, but a fling leaves her pregnant; and married Samantha finds that her baby boy is almost too much to handle.

* In The Other Woman (May), Eric Jerome Dickey's latest meditation on fidelity and betrayal, a young man and woman struggle to stitch their marriage back together after both of them have affairs.

* Like Jesse Ventura, wrestler Mick Foley has ambitions that don't involve smackdowns of leotard-clad opponents. Tietam Brown (July), Foley's raw debut novel, is the tale of a troubled high school student who must deal with the problems foisted upon him by a reckless father.

* Margaret Atwood is back with Oryx and Crake (May), a tightly plotted futuristic tale of survivors struggling to get by in a world devastated by environmental and scientific catastrophe.

PLUS Alisa Valdes--Rodriguez, The Dirty Girls Social Club (May; see review, page 82); Cristina Garcia, Monkey Hunting (May; see review, page 82); Suzan-Lori Parks, Getting Mother's Body (May; see review, page 78); Amanda Green, Family Trust (May); Elinor Lipman, The Pursuit of Alice Thrift (June; see review, page 70); Quentin Tarantino, Kill Bill (July); Joyce Carol Oates, The Tattooed Girl (May); Douglas Coupland, Hey Nostradamus! (July)

CRIME/MYSTERY/THRILLER

Ashecliffe Hospital, the setting for much of the action in Dennis Lehane's Shutter Island (May), is a strange place indeed: A barefoot woman escapes from a locked room; a shadowy group may be conducting secret psychiatric experiments; and someone is using cryptic codes to communicate clues to U.S. Marshal Teddy Daniels--who may be hiding some secrets of his own.

* Stephanie Plum, Janet Evanovich's wisecracking bounty hunter, returns in To the Nines (July). In pursuit of her latest quarry, Plum heads to Las Vegas, where she must evade three mobsters who want her dead.

* In Clive Cussler's White Death (June), written with Paul Kemprecos, supersleuth Kurt Austin and his pal Joe Zavala take to the seas to fight a sinister corporation.

* Fletch author Gregory McDonald returns with Flynn's World (June), his first Inspector Flynn novel in almost two decades. The irrepressible Boston police inspector tries to avoid getting fired while protecting a professor.

* Andrea Camilleri brings back Inspector Montalbano for The Snack Thief (May), in which Italy's Philip Marlowe attempts to solve two murders and a mysterious disappearance.

PLUS Lee Child, Persuader (April); Tony Hillerman, The Sinister Pig (May); James Patterson, The Lake House (June); Ted Bell, Hawke (June); Janette Turner Hospital, Due Preparations for the Plague (July); Walter Mosley, Fear Itself (July)

SPORTS & TRAVEL

For his latest book, the Sports Illustrated writer Rick Reilly worked as a caddy for some great golfers, including David Duval and Jill McGill, and some not-so-greats, including Deepak Chopra and Donald Trump. Who's Your Caddy? Looping for the Great, Near Great and Reprobates of Golf (May) is a hilarious report straight from the clubhouse.

* If your favorite sports nut runs out of things to debate, The Mad Dog 100: The One Hundred Greatest Sports Arguments of AU Time (May) by Chris Russo with Allen St. John will serve as the perfect inspiration.

* In Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game (June), Michael Lewis explores the nefarious influence of cash in professional sports. …

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Summer's New Wave: When You Reach the Final Page of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Don't Despair: There's a Tidal Wave of Other Noteworthy Books Coming out This Summer. Keep Cool with These 47 Picks
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