High Court Completing Weighty Session; College-Quota, Sodomy Cases among 33 Awaiting Rulings

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 12, 2003 | Go to article overview
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High Court Completing Weighty Session; College-Quota, Sodomy Cases among 33 Awaiting Rulings


Byline: Frank J. Murray, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Supreme Court justices last week put behind them seven months of courtroom arguments and now face less than seven weeks of arguing among themselves to thrash out the 33 remaining decisions before summer recess.

Constitutional questions still on the table include whether governments may do the following:

* Outlaw sodomy only among homosexuals.

* Favor certain races for college admissions.

* Censor library computers to shelter children from pornography.

* Gag a company so that it cannot contest political attacks.

The court next meets May 19, and then at least once every week until its final scheduled business day, June 26.

But the adjournment date is far from certain. One potential complication is a complex campaign-finance decision, a mountainous 1,638 pages of opinions and orders from a deeply divided special three-judge court. The justices must decide whether to postpone the effect of the lower-court decision or the law itself, and whether to yield to pressure to hold a special summer session on the case.

Prospects for speedy action on campaign finance, which also is likely to split the high court, would be sharply curtailed if any justice decides this is the year to retire from the most stable nine-justice court ever. The court's roll call has not changed in nearly nine years. The record for stability is 11 years and one month as of March 18, 1823, when the court had seven members.

Any confirmation fight would become even more contentious with such a high-stakes political law awaiting a verdict. Justices are traditionally loath to proceed on such a high-profile case with only seven or eight votes on the bench.

In its already significant 2002-03 term, the court has produced 41 written opinions.

On criminal matters it upheld the so-called Megan's laws, which permit posting identities of sex offenders on the Internet, allowed 25-to-life sentences for relatively minor offenses when they are "third strikes," and permitted states to outlaw cross-burning meant to intimidate.

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High Court Completing Weighty Session; College-Quota, Sodomy Cases among 33 Awaiting Rulings
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