Comment: Prof Peter Stoney; Prof Peter Stoney, Senior Fellow in Economics in the Management School at Liverpool University, on What the General Motors Decision Means for the Region's Economy

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), May 13, 2003 | Go to article overview

Comment: Prof Peter Stoney; Prof Peter Stoney, Senior Fellow in Economics in the Management School at Liverpool University, on What the General Motors Decision Means for the Region's Economy


I FEEL that we are looking at the rosiest situation for many a year following this announcement.

This investment in Ellesmere Port bolsters the manufacturing private sector which has in recent times been a bit of a worry,especially in comparison with the public and service sectors.

This sector has been struggling to sustain a significant presence on Merseyside and this is an important development.

There are a number with links with the motor industry and they form strong bonds with a particular factory and this is the case in Ellesmere Port.

Over and above the 3,000 or so strong workforce,at least 3,000 further people will benefit from this - those who provide services to Vauxhall,be it car components or catering.

There are so many ancillary services connected to the plant and this is a significant boost for the Ellesmere Port town economy.

It also blows a hole in the pro-eurolobby, because GM are saying that productivity counts and this a massive vote of confidence in the plant. …

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