PMS the Miracle Cure?; Kiss Goodbye to Monthly Mood Swings and Crying Fits. A New Drink from the US Alters Brain Chemistry in Just 30 Minutes Transforming You into a Sweet-Tempered Angel

The Mirror (London, England), May 15, 2003 | Go to article overview

PMS the Miracle Cure?; Kiss Goodbye to Monthly Mood Swings and Crying Fits. A New Drink from the US Alters Brain Chemistry in Just 30 Minutes Transforming You into a Sweet-Tempered Angel


Byline: HELEN CARROLL

IT sounds too good to be true. A simple drink which will end the monthly mood swings and misery that accompany severe premenstrual syndrome.

The new treatment, said to get rid of symptoms in just half an hour, has gone on sale in Britain. And the claims are not mere hype.

Clinical trials have proved that the drink banishes tears and anger leaving you calm and happy.

The science world is so impressed with the trial results that they have been published in two US medical journals. It was shown that three quarters of PMS sufferers taking PMS Escape were much less angry and tense before their period. Made from the humble potato mixed with fruit, the drink increases levels of an amino acid called tryptophan. This makes the brain produce more of the feel-good compound serotonin.

It is known that low levels of serotonin cause the unpleasant symptoms, so if you can raise serotonin levels back up, your PMS disappears.

It is the complex carbohydrate in the potato drink which boosts tryptophan, the fruit juice is just for taste. So you may ask why you couldn't just eat a potato, brown bread or brown rice.

Well this is exactly what the National Association for Premenstrual Syndrome advises.

"We tell sufferers to have a carbohydrate snack, such as a crispbread, every four hours," says Christine Barker from the association. "Personally I can't see any point buying a potato-based drink when you could just have a potato."

But the scientists who developed PMS Escape dispute this. First, being in drink form, the potato carbohydrate goes straight into the blood stream. It would take around two hours for solid carbohydrate (such as a baked potato) to be digested.

Second, you couldn't eat your potato with cheese or tuna because protein interferes with tryptophan getting into the brain. This also means you'd have to eat your bread and rice dry too. And finally, the amount of carbohydrate in the drink has been precisely measured to give the maximum tryptophan boost.

For eight months the drink's inventor, research scientist Dr Wurtman and her colleagues at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the US, gave the women taking part in their trials drinks made with differing doses.

As well as assessing the effect on the women's moods, they took blood tests to show the levels of tryptophan in the brain.

"What we've ended up with is a mixture which gives the greatest improvement," says Dr Wurtman. "We can guarantee that if you're sitting in your office crying simply because it's that time of the month you'll feel better within 30 minutes."

PMS Escape comes in powder sachets that you mix with 9oz of water. Dr Wurtman recommends taking one before breakfast and another in the afternoon on the days you expect PMS. Available in the US since 1995, it has just been licensed for sale in Britain.

AND with up to 50 per cent of the female population affected for as long as two weeks every month, it will be a welcome addition to many bathroom cabinets. It should, says Dr Wurtman, help all but one per cent of extreme sufferers. Dr Wurtman and her team discovered that carbohydrate can not only help ease bad moods but also PMS cravings.

"Our studies showed that if women added a certain amount of carbohydrate to their diets their brains made more serotonin and their symptoms eased. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

PMS the Miracle Cure?; Kiss Goodbye to Monthly Mood Swings and Crying Fits. A New Drink from the US Alters Brain Chemistry in Just 30 Minutes Transforming You into a Sweet-Tempered Angel
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.