Help from City Unlike Other Arts Centers in Fox Valley, Hemmens Gets Municipal Funds

By Spak, Kara | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 14, 2003 | Go to article overview

Help from City Unlike Other Arts Centers in Fox Valley, Hemmens Gets Municipal Funds


Spak, Kara, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Kara Spak Daily Herald Staff Writer

Performing arts are considered a transcendent endeavor, an opportunity to lift performers and their audience to experience a glimpse of the sublime.

In the wake of a national recession, however, the arts are increasingly being viewed through the cold prism of dollars and cents.

This is true in Elgin, where a budget crisis likely will lead to heightened scrutiny of the Hemmens Cultural Center, a uniquely funded arts venture.

Arts centers throughout Illinois are scrambling for funds, some just to stay open, said Alan Leder, visual and multidisciplinary arts director for the Illinois Arts Council.

"Overall in terms of funding (in Illinois) all centers are falling in the same category," Leder said. "Where is the money in a downsizing economy? The state will fund 8 to 10 percent of a budget, so 90 percent of what they have to raise comes from local communities, foundations and business."

For the Hemmens, the traditional place to seek local funding was the city's coffers, not directly from residents, businesses or grant agencies.

Unlike arts centers in Aurora and Crystal Lake, the Hemmens receives heavy operational support from the city of Elgin.

And unlike The Centre of Elgin recreation facility or the Highlands of Elgin golf course, the Hemmens is not designed to be self-sustaining, said Sean Stegall, Elgin's assistant city manager, a job that includes monitoring the Hemmens.

For 2003, $1.4 million was budgeted for the Hemmens, and $600,000, or 43 percent, is expected to come back to the city through ticket sales. The rest is financed through Elgin's general fund, the fund that fuels all ongoing city services.

"Performing arts centers are not self-supporting," Stegall said. "But it is a quality of life amenity like parks and recreation programs. You try to recover as many costs as you can but it is not set up in a manner allowing it to be self-supporting."

Elgin officials already made one big change at the Hemmens, eliminating the position of manager, one of 13 jobs cut throughout the city to help stave off a projected deficit of more than $2 million. Hemmens manager Blythe Rainey-Cuyler is still working for Elgin, but eventually the job will transition over to Stegall and a team of city employees.

Stegall added that the city council recently reconfirmed the mandate to improve not only the building, operations and quality of the line-up, but to have the shows pay for their direct costs.

The 2001-02 season was the first season that didn't pay for its direct costs, though Stegall said under Rainey-Cuyler's management the Hemmens "covered costs more than ever."

Two other local performing arts centers, the Paramount Arts Centre in Aurora and the Raue Center for the Arts in Crystal Lake, are self-sustaining non-profits.

Though intimately connected to their local communities, neither receives direct funding from the towns they reside in. Because they are not run by municipalities, officials at both venues did not provide annual budgets.

This less formalized and subsidized relationship forces the staff of the arts centers to offer not only cutting edge performances but also network deep within the community to guarantee people support the programming and venue.

"Not having any government support, you really have to rely on citizens saying, 'I really love this place, I really believe in this place,' " said Steve Duchrow, Raue's executive director. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Help from City Unlike Other Arts Centers in Fox Valley, Hemmens Gets Municipal Funds
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.