Indianapolis Uses Partnerships to Build Its Reputation as Life Sciences Leader: The City, Its Two Research Universities and Private Industry Are Joining to Forge New Paths in Medical and Scientific Research. (Special Report)

By Davis, Lance | Nation's Cities Weekly, May 19, 2003 | Go to article overview
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Indianapolis Uses Partnerships to Build Its Reputation as Life Sciences Leader: The City, Its Two Research Universities and Private Industry Are Joining to Forge New Paths in Medical and Scientific Research. (Special Report)


Davis, Lance, Nation's Cities Weekly


A unique partnership between the City of Indianapolis, the private sector and two well known research universities is carving out an important economic development niche for the city.

Long known as the home of the Indianapolis 500 and championship college basketball, public and corporate officials now say the Central Indiana Life Sciences Initiative (ILSI) will bring a new round of recognition to the city and Central Indiana.

"We are in the process of developing more of a brand identity so that people will know us for more than racing and college sports," said Greg Schenkle, CEO of Indy Partnership. "We also want them to know we have the best life sciences institutes in the world."

ILSI is a partnership between Indiana's Health Industry Forum, Central Indiana Corporate Partnership, Indiana University, Purdue University, Indy Partnership and Indianapolis that works to attract new companies and create jobs in the city's life sciences industry.

Indianapolis' and Central Indiana's $13.6 billion life sciences industry employs more than 82,000 workers in about 900 companies.

The region's two research universities account for more than $200 million in academic research commitments and graduate more than 10,000 life sciences students each year.

The region is also home to some of the biggest life sciences companies in the world, including Eli Lilly and Company, Guidant Corp., Roche Diagnostics and Dow AgroScience.

The initiative has already paid off with the formation of the Indiana Proteomics Consortium, a for-profit venture between Eli Lilly, Purdue and Indiana University. The consortium seeks to identify, characterize and quantify all proteins involved in a particular pathway, cell, tissue organ or organism.

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Indianapolis Uses Partnerships to Build Its Reputation as Life Sciences Leader: The City, Its Two Research Universities and Private Industry Are Joining to Forge New Paths in Medical and Scientific Research. (Special Report)
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