Brothers in Arms: American Soldiers Fight Side by Side with Openly Gay British Troops-Punching Holes in the Military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Policy

By Bull, Chris | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), May 13, 2003 | Go to article overview

Brothers in Arms: American Soldiers Fight Side by Side with Openly Gay British Troops-Punching Holes in the Military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Policy


Bull, Chris, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


In touting the benefits of a military victory over Saddam Hussein's regime, President Bush has cited such things as the potential for democracy in the Middle East and the elimination of stockpiles of weapons of mass destruction. But there is one unintended outcome of the conflict that neither the White House nor the Pentagon has anticipated: undermining the rationale for "don't ask, don't tell," the Bush-supported military policy regarding gay and lesbian service members.

During Operation Iraqi Freedom, U.S. and British military forces have collaborated more closely than they have since World War II. Coalition troops have mounted air attacks, run joint special operations, coordinated aerial bombardments and troop movements--in short, lived and died together. And since the United Kingdom ended its ban on gay and lesbian service members in January 2000, American troops are serving alongside openly gay British troops--or at least know that they could be. (A third major coalition partner, Australia, also allows gays and lesbians to serve openly.)

"This historic British and American military integration has obvious implications for 'don't ask, don't tell,'" says Aaron Belkin, director of the Center for the Study of Sexual Minorities in the Military at the University of California, Santa Barbara. "The argument has always been that serving alongside gays and lesbians would cause military cohesion to fall apart and place a burden on trust in the field. Clearly that's not happening on the battlefields of Iraq.'

Adds Simon Langley, media spokesman for the Armed Forces Gay and Lesbian Association, a British lobbying and support group: "In some cases the two services are working incredibly closely. We don't have any specific examples yet, but it's inevitable that in the conversations between American and British troops it will come up. The American guys know there are gay guys in the British military and that it doesn't affect anything. They have much bigger things on their minds than sexual orientation."

When "don't ask, don't tell" was adopted in 1993, the power to overturn the policy was transferred from the Pentagon to Congress. And with Republicans in the majority in both the House and Senate, it is unlikely there will be a serious initiative to change the policy before the 2004 election. But when the subject is next debated, the glaring difference between the British and American policies could force proponents of "don't ask, don't tell" to resort to political arguments about homosexuality rather than military efficacy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Brothers in Arms: American Soldiers Fight Side by Side with Openly Gay British Troops-Punching Holes in the Military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Policy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.