2003-2005 National Officers

American Music Teacher, June-July 2003 | Go to article overview

2003-2005 National Officers


Phyllis Pieffer, NCTM, is MTNA president. She has been actively involved in MTNA for thirty years, having previously held such positions as MTNA president-elect and vice president for membership development; Colorado state president, certification chair and competition chair; West Central Division president and junior high competition coordinator; and MTNA high school performance competitions coordinator.

Pieffer holds degrees in piano performance from the College of Wooster in Wooster, Ohio, and in music theory from the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York. A firm believer in the importance of local associations, she was instrumental in developing the Foothills MTA in Lakewood, Colorado. While residing in Colorado, she served as assistant professor and chair of the Music Department at Colorado Christian University (CCU) in Lakewood, in addition to maintaining a successful independent music studio. During her tenure at CCU, she regularly performed in chamber music, solo and duo-piano recitals. Pieffer also has served as an adjudicator throughout Colorado and for the National Guild of Piano Teachers. As a clinician, she frequently gives programs on parliamentary procedure as well as various piano pedagogy topics. Now residing in Aberdeen, Washington, Pieffer teaches piano and theory at Grays Harbor College, operates an independent music studio and performs as part of a duo-piano team and a flute-piano ensemble.

Gail Berenson, NCTM, is MTNA vice president. She has been a member of MTNA since 1968, joining as a fledgling faculty member at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Since then, she has held a variety of Illinois State MTA, Ohio MTA (OMTA) and MTNA offices. After accepting a position on the piano faculty at Ohio University, she initiated the founding of the Southeast District of OMTA. She was OMTA president, co-chair of the 1980 and 1990 Ohio State Conventions, Collegiate Buckeye Competition chair, OMTA student chapters chair and OMTA historian. She holds the MTNA Master Certificate in piano and piano pedagogy and also was awarded the 1999 OMTA "Outstanding Teacher of the Year" award. Berenson served as OMTA Southeast District's vice chair for teacher activities. Her national involvement in MTNA began in 1995 as a member of the MTNA Pedagogy Committee. In addition, she has served as MTNA piano chair on the 1996 and 1997 Convention Committees and was a two-term member of the American Music Teacher Editorial Committee. She now is serving as 2002 and 2003 MTNA National Conference chair.

Berenson is professor of piano and chair of the keyboard division at Ohio University, Athens, where she was awarded the "Distinguished Teacher of the Year" Award for 2000. An active performer, as well as a noted expert on musician wellness issues, she is a coauthor of A Symposium for Pianists and Teachers: Strategies to Develop Mind and Body for Optimal Performance and a contributor to the new piano method Piano Discoveries as a member of the Lorenz Advisory Board. Holding degrees from Northwestern University, Gail has performed and lectured in more than twenty-five states, as well as Great Britain, Belgium, Switzerland, Israel and Canada. Her students are performing and teaching in private studios and on college faculties throughout the United States.

Paul Stewart, NCTM, is MTNA president-elect. He is chair of the keyboard division at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG), where he teaches piano performance studies and pedagogy. He holds a D.M. degree in piano performance from Florida State University, an M.M. degree from the University of Illinois and B.M. and B.M.E. degrees from Indiana University.

Prior to becoming president-elect, Stewart was MTNA treasurer. During 2000-2001, he served as chair of the National Convention Planning Committee for the Minneapolis and Washington, D. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

2003-2005 National Officers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.