The Messages We Send. (Independent Music Teachers Forum)

By Klingenstein, Beth Gigante | American Music Teacher, June-July 2003 | Go to article overview

The Messages We Send. (Independent Music Teachers Forum)


Klingenstein, Beth Gigante, American Music Teacher


What message does the tone of our voice send? What impression does our appearance have on students and parents? Body language, voice inflection, speech habits, eye contact, facial expressions, posture and clothing all can impact the way we are perceived in the independent studio.

There is an old saying, "The way you say what you say and the way you look when you say it speak so loudly that I can't hear what it is you are saying." If our body language and words are inconsistent, people will believe our body language. For example, "I'm sure I could do it" said with a soft voice and shaky demeanor will not inspire confidence. "I am not angry!" delivered with clenched teeth also is not convincing.

How can this be applied to the studio? Explaining tuition rates to parents in a timid, apologetic way opens up an immediate debate on the subject. Conversely, if a parent questions why a child will not receive a make-up lesson, a firm, direct response without fidgeting or looking down will reinforce the existing policy.

What if students don't appear to be engaged in their lessons? They could be reacting to a voice tone that is boring or difficult to follow. We can ask ourselves, "Do I speak in a monotone? Do I speak too softly?" Both convey that what is being said isn't very important. Speaking too loudly is perceived as being aggressive. Speaking too quickly could frustrate a student, especially if he or she is having trouble understanding. "Do I repeat things too many times before moving on? Do I take a long time to explain what could be covered briefly?" Well-paced speech, at an appropriate tone level, can help keep our students involved.

Filler words such as "um," "like," "okay" and "you know" detract from the directness and interest of what is said. The first time I taught a class in graduate school, I said "okay" eighty-four times in a half-hour. "Okay, are you ready? Okay." (Yes, someone was counting.)

The significance of eye contact is immense. Often, our students are not facing us in lessons, and it is easy to lose track of how much time goes by without eye contact. Eye contact is an important part of being perceived as honest, sincere and confident. Our students need to be looking in our eyes as we speak to them, and we need to be looking more directly at them when they answer our questions.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Messages We Send. (Independent Music Teachers Forum)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.