Stroh Was Once Top Navy Officer in Jacksonville

By Kerr, Jessie-Lynne | The Florida Times Union, May 31, 2003 | Go to article overview

Stroh Was Once Top Navy Officer in Jacksonville


Kerr, Jessie-Lynne, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Jessie-Lynne Kerr, Times-Union staff writer

Retired Vice Adm. Robert J. Stroh, once the top naval officer in Jacksonville, died Thursday morning at home from complications of a fall three weeks ago. He was 95.

He had resided with his daughter and her family in Mandarin for eight years.

At Adm. Stroh's request, there will be no funeral. His remains and those of his wife of 57 years, Gloria, who died in 1995, will be buried at sea in a private ceremony by the family.

"He was one of the finest men I've known," said Peter Kirill of Jacksonville, a former national vice president of the Navy League of the United States and a longtime friend.

Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Adm. Stroh graduated from Evander Childs High School before enrolling in the U.S. Naval Academy in 1926. He graduated in 1930 and, after Navy flight training at Pensacola, was designated an aviator in January 1932.

As a Navy pilot, Adm. Stroh logged more than 5,000 hours of flight and made more than 125 carrier landings. During World War II he commanded a photographic squadron that accomplished the initial photo reconnaissance of Japanese bases in the Pacific islands. For his services during World War II, Adm. Stroh was awarded the Legion of Merit, the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal with two Gold Stars.

In 1955, he was assigned as the prospective commanding officer of the USS Saratoga and became the Jacksonville-based carrier's first commander when it was commissioned in 1956.

At the beginning of the Vietnam War, he served on the staff of the commander in chief of the Pacific Fleet. Adm. Stroh then was given command of Carrier Division 6, which was involved in the Cuban missile crisis.

In 1963, four years before taking the helm of the Navy command in Jacksonville, Adm. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Stroh Was Once Top Navy Officer in Jacksonville
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.