Report: Minorities, Women Losing Ground in Sports Employment. (Noteworthy News)

Black Issues in Higher Education, May 22, 2003 | Go to article overview

Report: Minorities, Women Losing Ground in Sports Employment. (Noteworthy News)


NEW YORK

Women and minorities are losing ground in professional and college sports employment, reversing a trend toward greater diversity, according to a study released last month.

Every professional sport had lower averages for employing women compared with the last "Racial and Gender Report Card" two years ago, and minority hiring slipped in pro and college sports, the study found.

"While we are creeping toward fair play, we still have a long road ahead," says sports sociologist Dr. Richard Lapchick, author of the report published by the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport at the University of Central Florida.

Only baseball, the NBA and NHL improved their grades for minority hiring compared with the 2001 report.

The 12th issue of the report card studied players, coaches and front office/athletic department employees of major league baseball, the NFL, NBA, NHL, WNBA, Major League Soccer and college sports. It found:

* Minorities (Blacks, Asians, Latinos, Pacific Islanders and American Indians) lost ground in most of the top management positions in college and professional sports, including general managers, team vice presidents and college athletic directors.

* The percentage of Black men playing college and pro sports continued its decade-long decline in all sports except college and pro basketball and college baseball.

* The percentage of international players continued to grow in major league baseball, the NBA, NFL and soccer. …

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