Missile Madness: As Middle East Tensions Increase the Menace of a New Arms Race by Regional Powers Sharpens. (Armaments)

By Blanche, Ed | The Middle East, June 2003 | Go to article overview

Missile Madness: As Middle East Tensions Increase the Menace of a New Arms Race by Regional Powers Sharpens. (Armaments)


Blanche, Ed, The Middle East


With the Middle East once again swept by war and turmoil and the Bush administration seeking to reshape the region, western concern about missile proliferation there has sharpened considerably, with allegations that Iraq and Libya have been getting European help to develop cruise systems. Meanwhile, Syria and Libya are reported to be continuing efforts to acquire nuclear and chemical weapons, with assistance from North Korea, Pakistan and possibly one or more Gulf states.

Egypt reportedly gets help from North Korea for its efforts to develop a ballistic missile. Cairo denies that, but the Americans continue to monitor their key Arab ally anyway. The December "interception" in the Arabian Sea of a North Korean ship carrying 15 Scud-C missiles to Yemen by a Spanish frigate of the multinational naval force combating terrorism underlined western efforts to stem the flow of such weapons and the technology to produce them into the Middle East.

But while the US-led campaign has had some success, it has proved impossible to institute a complete block. Following strident protests from Yemen--another supposed American ally in the war against terrorism--the US was forced to release the Scuds and other components hidden aboard the 3,500-tonne So San, that was sailing unflagged, and allow them to be delivered to Yemen.

The US and Israel (whose arsenal of weapons of mass destruction (WMPs) and ballastic missiles programme is by far the most advanced and lethal in the region but which the Americans never mention) have made much of the perceived threat to them from these states and Ariel Sharon, in particular, has sought to emphasise the dangers his country faces. Regional hostility towards the US and Israel mushrooms over George W. Bush's war with Iraq and Sharon's relentless oppression of the Palestinians. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Missile Madness: As Middle East Tensions Increase the Menace of a New Arms Race by Regional Powers Sharpens. (Armaments)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.