Vote, Vote, Vote to Keep Your Job. (European Referendums)

By Almond, Mark | New Statesman (1996), May 26, 2003 | Go to article overview

Vote, Vote, Vote to Keep Your Job. (European Referendums)


Almond, Mark, New Statesman (1996)


In cold war Europe, east and west held elections regularly. In the west, what validated democracy was pluralism. In eastern Europe, what counted was turnout. Voters were offered a single candidate. Before 1989, refusing to come and vote was the equivalent of voting "No". Few bothered to risk the consequences of coming in person to cross out the party's chosen candidate. The communist candidate routinely got 99.9 per cent of votes.

Today, everything is supposed to have changed in the new Europe, as eight favoured ex-communist countries march towards a brighter future in Brussels. Yet in each of the four countries that have held referendums paving the way for entry into the European Union--Slovenia, Hungary, Lithuania and last weekend Slovakia--all the talk has been about how many voters would make the pilgrimage to the polls and not whether they would endorse joining the EU.

After decades of isolation behind the Iron Curtain, "rejoining Europe" was a popular slogan in 1989, but 14 years on, the EU has offered less generous terms of admission than many easterners had hoped for. Euro enthusiasm has waned. Only the political class in the new Europe has retained its enthusiasm for getting seats at the European Parliament in Strasbourg or on the European Commission in Brussels.

In Lithuania, the media coverage resembled a throwback to communist-era blanket appeals for participation. Special buses were laid on and rules restricting voters to their own local polling station waived. The vote was spread over two days, which gave the authorities the opportunity to assess the turnout overnight and take what President Rolandas Paksas called "special measures", if necessary, to boost participation above the 50 per cent level required to validate the poll. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Vote, Vote, Vote to Keep Your Job. (European Referendums)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.