Unlocking History's Trove: Presidential Library Web Sites Offer Powerful Education Opportunities. (the Online Edge)

By Dyrli, Odvard Egil | District Administration, June 2003 | Go to article overview

Unlocking History's Trove: Presidential Library Web Sites Offer Powerful Education Opportunities. (the Online Edge)


Dyrli, Odvard Egil, District Administration


How educationally valuable would it be if your teachers and students could gain access to six boxes of formerly classified presidential documents kept locked in Franklin Delano Roosevelt's White House safe in the '30s and '40s? And what insights might they derive from combing through President Truman's diaries, letters and speeches describing negotiations with the Allies and detailing feelings about his decision to drop the atomic bomb in World War II?

Such original source materials would humanize historic events that are part of the curriculum in every school district and provide perspectives on presidential decisions that no textbook could duplicate.

The great news is that all of these documents--and many more--are available online through the Web sites of the presidential libraries that were set up to preserve the papers, records and historic materials of U.S. presidents since Herbert Hoover. These sites offer searchable documents, photographs, political cartoons, audio and film clips, and are all linked to NARA, the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration site. The libraries also include special sections targeted to K-12 education, with multimedia exhibits, curriculum guides, lesson plans and teaching units.

The traditional social studies curriculum in most K-12 schools emphasizes the acquisition of facts: names, dates and events. In contrast, the National Council for the Social Studies specifies that K-12 students should "understand the purpose of government and how its powers are acquired, used and justified," which requires collecting and processing often conflicting data to arrive at conclusions based on historical evidence.

Online documents from the presidential libraries offer unparalleled opportunities for students to do such original research.

School Applications

In order to help students and educators "make sense of the vast amount of source material on the Internet," Peter A. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Unlocking History's Trove: Presidential Library Web Sites Offer Powerful Education Opportunities. (the Online Edge)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.