Stuck on Darlington Station Again, and Still No Sign of Pete's Mum's Scarf. (Northside)

By Martin, Andrew | New Statesman (1996), June 2, 2003 | Go to article overview

Stuck on Darlington Station Again, and Still No Sign of Pete's Mum's Scarf. (Northside)


Martin, Andrew, New Statesman (1996)


In 1977, my friend Pete was refurbishing an old motorbike, and one freezing afternoon in York he asked if I'd like to take a spin with him. I agreed, even though it meant sitting in the coffin-like sidecar. He disappeared into his house, and came out a minute later togged up like Biggles, and offering me the loan of one of his mother's scarves.

After an hour or so, we came to a stop alongside a field near Malton. "You all right?" asked Pete. I told him I was extremely cold -- it was now snowing heavily -- and asked why we'd stopped. "Run out of petrol," he said phlegmatically. We flagged down a police car and the copper said he'd run us to a filling station. Pete gave me a petrol can, which had been rattling around with me in the sidecar, saying he would stay with the bike. When I'd filled the can, the policeman took me back to Pete, and began inspecting the bike. I hoped -- and assumed -- he would find some aspect of it that was illegal, but instead he complimented Pete on the machine.

When we set off again, I assumed we were heading back to York, but the next time we stopped we were on the edge of Darlington, and in the middle of a blizzard. Pete thought the front tyre was probably going down, at which point I walked to a pub, where I got a minicab to Darlington station.

At Darlington the trains were disrupted by snow. After two hours, a York train came in, but I couldn't board it because, somewhere between the buffet, and various frosty benches on deserted platforms, I had lost Pete's mum's scarf. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Stuck on Darlington Station Again, and Still No Sign of Pete's Mum's Scarf. (Northside)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.