E-Business: Weblogs Are the New Dot.Coms

The Birmingham Post (England), June 10, 2003 | Go to article overview

E-Business: Weblogs Are the New Dot.Coms


Byline: Giles Turnbull

Believe it or not, people are still starting up Internet-based businesses. These days, or course, they don't expect instant praise in the broadsheet newspapers, nor do their founders anticipate becoming paper millionaires within days of launch.

The new generation of dot.com companies are treading very carefully indeed, focusing from the outset on one very important business basic - profit.

20six (www.20six.co.uk) is one of them, created by a pan-European group of experienced entrepreneurs with a passion for the web. The product on offer is something different: weblogs.

The theory behind the company's business plan goes something like this, as explained by UK managing director Azeem Azhar. Back in the days of the last dotcom boom, there were probably no more than 50 weblogs anywhere in the world, and you could keep track of all of them quite easily.

But weblogs - very personal sites, updated frequently, and usually containing a lot of links to other sites - have become enormously popular. Now there are more than anyone can count (Azeem Azhar thinks there are three million in the US, and about 25,000 in the UK).

So it's clear that people like the idea of having a website to call their own, a kind of online diary that they can update as and when they feel like it. It's partly about personal publishing, and it's partly about joining a rapidly-growing community, since webloggers tend to find themselves communicating with, reading, and linking to other webloggers' sites.

The crucial bit is that, according to Azeem, five to ten per cent of people who start their own weblog end up wanting to make use of extra features, and are prepared to pay money for them.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

E-Business: Weblogs Are the New Dot.Coms
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.