Alan Milburn Quits Cabinet

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), June 12, 2003 | Go to article overview

Alan Milburn Quits Cabinet


Byline: JON SMITH

HEALTH Secretary Alan Milburn quit the cabinet today as Tony Blair began his long awaited reshuffle.

Mr Milburn told the Prime Minister on Monday that he wanted to leave the government because he had found it increasingly difficult to balance having a young family in the north east with the demands of his job.

No replacement for Mr Milburn has been announced and Downing Street said no further details of the reshuffle would be released until later today.

Mr Blair's official spokesman said: ``I can confirm that there will be a reshuffle later today but we would advise you that the detail will not become apparent until later this afternoon, with this one exception.''

The spokesman added: ``The reasons Mr Milburn gives are contained in his letter and there is no other reason why he has decided to leave the government.''

In his letter to Mr Blair Mr Milburn said: ``It has been an enormous privilege to serve in government for six years. But I have already missed a good bit of my children growing up, and I don't want to miss any more'' ``It is not a political decision for I support you totally in what you are trying to do. It is entirely personal. …

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