The Art of Flight: Looking Back at a Century of Flight through the Work of Post Cover Artists and Photographers. (the Saturday Evening Post Celebrates)

The Saturday Evening Post, July-August 2003 | Go to article overview

The Art of Flight: Looking Back at a Century of Flight through the Work of Post Cover Artists and Photographers. (the Saturday Evening Post Celebrates)


Once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards ... " Leonardo da Vinci wrote.

Post artists have had their eyes turned skyward since at least Dec. 25, 1909, when artist Sarah Stilwell-Weber's painting of a young boy with his Christmas toys depicted the first airplane ever on a Saturday Evening Post cover. In the following issue, the great illustrator J.C. Leyendecker set the tone for the first century of flight with his New Year's 1910 cover of a hesitant daredevil cherub piloting a Wright brothers-style flyer.

Airplanes swooped onto our cover again in 1917 with Henry J. Soulen's exciting depiction of a WWI aerial dogfight, and just a month later came Neysa McMein's portrait of a brave lady flyer.

Cover artist Norman Rockwell celebrated the great flying hero Charles Lindbergh in a July 23, 1927, cover painting entitled simply Pioneer. By 1938, Rockwell's cover portrait of a kindly country grandmother on a trans-oceanic flight said it all--the final frontier, the air, had been conquered.

We would be willing to bet that Charles De Soria, who took this cover photo for the April 6, 1940, issue, knew the exact flight path of the airplane before setting up the shot. The real art here was getting the plane and boy in just the right positions. (left) Just what is artist J.C. Leyendecker trying to show us? That flight is in its infancy, of course, but also that we'd better find something for pilots to wear.

If there had been a May 21 Saturday Evening Post issue in 1928, it would have been the perfect anniversary of Charles A. Lindbergh's momentous transatlantic flight. Edgar Franklin Wittmack's cover tribute to the Spirit of Aviation actually appeared on the May 12 issue of that year.

This World War I cover by Henry J. Soulen seems to perfectly illustrate Alfred, Lord Tennyson's famous line from Locksley Hall: "Heard the heavens fill with shouting, and there rain'd a ghastly dew/From the nations' airy navies grappling in the central blue."

On a material-gathering trip to Washington, D.C., artist John Atherton was captivated by these two boys he saw watching the big planes at the airport. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Art of Flight: Looking Back at a Century of Flight through the Work of Post Cover Artists and Photographers. (the Saturday Evening Post Celebrates)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.