Ancient Egypt in Modern Memphis

By Walker, Anna Kay | School Arts, March 1991 | Go to article overview

Ancient Egypt in Modern Memphis


Walker, Anna Kay, School Arts


Memphis, Tennessee is a natural spot for Egyptomania. Residents, both long- and short-term, know the city's name originates with the capital of ancient Egypt. The ancient city's location on the Nile parallels modern Memphis on the Mississippi, the "American Nile." Local interest in Egyptology had no academic focus, however, until 1984, when the Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology was founded at Memphis State University. Since its establishment, the Institute's faculty has increased from one to three Egyptologists and has built an international reputation.

The educational mission of the Institute centers around its collection of Egyptian antiquities, which is continually augmented by gifts, purchases and long-term loans. This collection is housed in the Egyptian Hall of the Memphis State University Gallery and is a cultural resource and teaching tool for the University, the city and the Mid-South. There are antiquities from the full range of Egyptian ancient history: Pre-Dynastic (c. 4000-3200 B.C.) through Coptic (c. 200-640 A.D.). Objects, like tweezers and jewelry, remind visitors that ancient Egyptians had day-to-day concerns similar to ours. The mummy of Iretiruw is frequently introduced as the University's oldest faculty member. He is certainly an effective teacher. Children are spellbound by him, but adults are not beyond his grasp. A team front the University of Tennessee Medical School has made a study of him--complete with CAT scan.

Egyptology in the classroom

The education program of the Institute supports the Egyptological interest within the local and Mid-South school systems through its traditional docent-led tours, its participation in the Memphis Arts Council's "Arts in the Schools" program, and its education packet for teachers. The time-tested, docent-led tour for students is the backbone of the Institute's school program. Teachers realize that a first-hand experience of art has a profound potential for piquing a student's curiosity. In order to entrance the gallery experience, docents attend classes to learn the basics of Egyptian history, culture, language and geography, and then they relate this knowledge to the specific antiquities in the Egyptian Hall. The docents use the education packet, which is made available to teachers, and thus, have a scale by which to measure students' knowledge and meet their level of understanding.

Of course, many difficulties may thwart a teacher's desire to bring his/her class to visit the Egyptian collection. Therefore, through the Memphis Arts Council's "Arts in the Schools" program, graduate students and docents are trained to visit the classroom and give a presentation adaptable in length and complexity to the age and knowledge level of the class. This presentation includes a slide show and display of reproductions of Egyptian antiquities.

The education packet offers material which will aid the teacher to present, process and reinforce basic artistic and cultural concepts. The Institute currently has a packet which includes sections on such subjects as hieroglyphs, mythology, arts and crafts, and what is found in a tomb. A grant from the National Endowment for the Arts has made possible the development of a new and more extensive education packet. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ancient Egypt in Modern Memphis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.